Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Space Science

Non-Profit Space Rocket Launching In a Week 127

Posted by samzenpus
from the diy-to-the-stars dept.
Plammox writes "A non-profit suborbital space endeavor lead by Kristian von Bengtson and Peter Madsen is trying to put a man in space. The first test of the boosters and space craft in combination with the sea launch platform will take place this week. The catch? All of this is a non-profit project based on voluntary labor and sponsors. How will they get the launch platform out in the middle of the Baltic sea to perform the test? With the founder's home-built submarine pushing it, of course."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Non-Profit Space Rocket Launching In a Week

Comments Filter:
  • Re:Home built (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Spad (470073) <slashdot@nOspaM.spad.co.uk> on Monday August 23, 2010 @04:57AM (#33338396) Homepage

    If you build it properly does it matter where you build it?

  • Re:Home built (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 23, 2010 @05:16AM (#33338470)

    It matters where you test it - and how willing are you to break N custom-built pieces to ensure N+1 and onwards won't crack under pressure.

    Say what you want about greedy manufacturers trying to lower costs, but proper QA requires economies of scale - there is a reason prototypes ended up in museums and not flying to the moon.

  • Just noted this: (Score:3, Insightful)

    by maxwell demon (590494) on Monday August 23, 2010 @05:34AM (#33338542) Journal

    Just noted this:

    The mission has a 100% peacefull purpose and is not in any way involved in carrying explosive, nuclear, biological and chemical payloads.

    If they want to put a man into space, how can they avoid biological payloads?

  • by Peet42 (904274) <Peet42.Netscape@net> on Monday August 23, 2010 @05:51AM (#33338598)
    Many NASA missions were "non-profit".
  • Re:Suborbital (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mangu (126918) on Monday August 23, 2010 @05:53AM (#33338602)

    basically a glorified carnival ride, a couple of magnitudes easier than fully orbital.

    Considering they are launching it from a sea launch platform they built, which will be towed to sea with the submarine they built, I'd say this is several orders of magnitude more awesome than what anybody else ever did.

    Let's see, how many orders of magnitude harder things have you ever done? Links, please.

  • Re:Suborbital (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Arlet (29997) on Monday August 23, 2010 @05:55AM (#33338612)

    Even if you find the right mix of materials for the heat shield, you'll still need to get the angle just right. Too steep, and the g-forces will kill you, the shield will get extremely hot, and it will be subjected to huge pressures. Too shallow, and the heat shield will be subjected to heat for much longer, so it has time to conduct through.

    Jumping out with a regular parachute on your back requires an accurate landing. It's not so much fun in the middle of the Atlantic with nobody near your location.

  • Re:Suborbital (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Arlet (29997) on Monday August 23, 2010 @06:17AM (#33338692)

    I was talking about entry vehicles with a live astronaut whom you don't want to turn into toast or jelly.

  • by QuantumG (50515) * <qg@biodome.org> on Monday August 23, 2010 @07:01AM (#33338882) Homepage Journal

    Why do so many people have a grasp of rocketry as "stuff other people have already done". When you think about learning guitar do you ever find yourself saying "nah, they already did that in the '50s".

  • by mangu (126918) on Monday August 23, 2010 @08:01AM (#33339184)

    why does it sound to me like 1950's space research?

    Because they are doing it the way true pioneers do. Not by requesting grants from some big government and untangling miles of red tape. Not by licking some politicians ass helping him get a few votes subcontracting some part to a company in his district.

    it means individuals are close to mastering trans continental missiles, and that worries me a bit

    Why? Why would a hobbyist's dream worry you more than some dictator's nightmare?

    Better live in a society where people have constructive hobbies like this than in a society where the only encouraged activity is to memorize some long dead prophet's words.

  • by Eunuchswear (210685) on Monday August 23, 2010 @09:06AM (#33339716) Journal

    why does it sound to me like 1950's space research?

    Because they are doing it the way true pioneers do. Not by requesting grants from some big government and untangling miles of red tape. Not by licking some politicians ass helping him get a few votes subcontracting some part to a company in his district.

    Because NASA and the US Air Force in the 1950s were the home of rugged anti-government individualism, free of all political pressure?

    Sorry, what?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 23, 2010 @07:14PM (#33348736)

    Unless we fire it all off into space, I'd say the trashheap would be a good place to start.

The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness. -- John Muir

Working...