Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Fatty Foods May Cause Cocaine-Like Addiction

Comments Filter:
  • by elrous0 (869638) * on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:03AM (#31655846)
    You ever sucked d**k for a cheeseburger?
    • by j00r0m4nc3r (959816) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:15AM (#31655954)
      Sucked duck? I don't get it...
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Its a good point however if you could get cocaine/heroine for 99 cents, on ANY corner, in a drive through. If it was advertised on every nearly every billboard, if it was glorified on every commercial as a way to bring the family together or to just relax after a hard days work. If no one went to jail for making it. Then no one would to need to suck anything to get one either.

      • The idea of cocaine or heroin being advertised as a way to get the family together is absolutely fucking hilarious.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Nope. And no-one would if drugs were legal and cheap.

    • Why don't you just type dick? You don't need to blank out words just because they have naughty connotations. Just the ones that have no clean ones. That is, if you're even censoring at all.
    • by AP31R0N (723649)

      Why would you quote Bob Saget who raped and murdered a girl in 1990?

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by thijsh (910751)
      Great paraphrase of a quote from one of the funniest stoner movies, Half Baked: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120693/quotes?qt0426764 [imdb.com]

      That was a real funny quote that actually got me thinking years back that cannabis might not be so bad as some people try to scare you into believing... Nobody sucks dick for weed, and nobody overdosed on the stuff *ever*... Sadly you can't say the same about fatty (or sugary) foods, the death toll is like 0 to a couple million. But I must note that there might be a slight c
  • OK, so now... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by nycguy (892403) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:04AM (#31655848)
    ...I have just as much respect for fat people as I do for drug addicts.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Right, because Fat people are responsible for the first fatty foods they ate given to them by their parents just like a drug addict, right?

      You are probably some young punk who is thin without having to work at it. I was that way, once. 165 lbs ad 5'11" when I got out of high school. Well believe me, even if you work at keeping thin, it's still possible to get fat no matter what you do.

      And if you can't have respect for fat people, try a little sympathy.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by SBFCOblivion (1041418)

        And if you can't have respect for fat people, try a little sympathy.

        I feel sympathy towards overweight children because their parents are more than likely the cause. The parents should care more about making sure their child is healthy.

        I do not, however, feel sympathy towards fat adults. I'm fat myself. I know it is within my power to correct the issue, I'm just lazy. I don't mean that I do nothing but sit around. I'm lazy about watching what I eat and in what portions. I expect a large number of overweight people have similar stories.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by fredjh (1602699)

          Agreed... I have no one to blame but myself. It's not society's fault; it's not McDonald's fault (although I don't eat there anyway, but you get the idea).

          I'm a work-a-holic right now, have two kids to chauffeur around, and don't take the time to eat right and exercise. When I make a conceivable schedule for a day and squeeze in proper meals and a workout around work and kids, my wife asks "where am I on your list?" It just doesn't all fit. But it's my choice, I just choose to continue taking my kids to

  • Human food (Score:5, Funny)

    by kiehlster (844523) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:06AM (#31655876) Homepage
    Oh, few... At first I read that as rats gorging themselves on human fat. Wait a minute... maybe the end of the world will come when rats get a cocaine-like addiction to eating humans. Everybody PANIC!
  • Any questions?

    Yeah, can I get mine over easy? It goes in the syringe better.

    • by GaryOlson (737642)
      From TFA

      "... people learned to purify or alter cocaine to deliver it more efficiently to their brains... This made the drug more addictive.
      ... We purify our food...we eat corn syrup."

      Can High Fructose Corn Syrup now be listed as a controlled substance and dispensed only by prescription?

  • Availability (Score:2, Insightful)

    by kirill.s (1604911)
    They are also much easier to obtain than cocaine and cost less.
    • First they came for the cocaine. But I was not a coke head, and so I said nothing
      First they came for the Tobacco. But I was not a smoker, and so I said nothing
      Then they came for burgers, but by then I was 400lbs. and couldn't leave the house.

      But in all seriousness, I see this as gearing up for a fatty-food sin tax. Just as they are taxing and shaming lung-cancer out of existence, they're going to try and make the USA fit.
  • by Spazntwich (208070) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:14AM (#31655946)

    Does this mean fatty food is "that" addictive, or does this perhaps mean cocaine isn't that addictive? Though I suppose the mere notion of shades of "addictiveness" can be dishonest itself, considering the binary nature of addiction (you either are, or you aren't, and exhibit a different set of behaviors based on that).

    Also, I wonder if this study holds true for various other pleasurable inputs. As far as anyone knows, cocaine acts by causing direct stimulation of the reward center, a property shared by (as far as I know) any behavior the brain seeks to reinforce, including eating energy dense foods, so I wonder if things like bathing and receiving affection could also demonstrate similar "cocaine-like addictions," witness OCD handwashing and narcissism.

    Seems like the scientists continue to find supporting evidence for the brilliant motto, "Everything in moderation. Including moderation." Except probably cocaine.

    • by russotto (537200)

      As far as anyone knows, cocaine acts by causing direct stimulation of the reward center, a property shared by (as far as I know) any behavior the brain seeks to reinforce, including eating energy dense foods,

      Cocaine causes direct stimulation of certain receptors within the brain associated with pleasure. Energy-dense foods cause _indirect_ stimulation of receptors. The problem with calling anything which stimulates pleasure receptors "addictive" (and therefore implicitly bad) should be obvious, unless y

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Spazntwich (208070)

        I've been doing a horrible job of clearly making my implications lately, lol.

        I didn't mean to imply any sort of puritanical value, or even to imply that something "addictive" is bad. If anything, I'd say any act someone enjoys can reach the level of addiction given enough other coinciding factors, and addictive behavior is rarely even the "fault" of the specific behavior but more an emergent consequence of a number of things.

        I've been up all night and am now rambling. I hope I haven't said anything too stup

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Hatta (162192)

      Also, I wonder if this study holds true for various other pleasurable inputs.

      Yes. All this research shows is that pleasurable stimuli are reinforcing. Fatty foods activate reward pathways in the same way cocaine does. But so does sex, gambling, shopping, video games, etc. Choose your poison.

  • by Ogive17 (691899)
    My gf gives me a free pass to stop by Wendy's once a week so I can get my fill of a double cheeseburger. If they weren't so unhealthy I would probably get one every day. I do have a sliver of willpower left.
  • by plasticsquirrel (637166) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:16AM (#31655970)
    From the article:

    They began to eat compulsively, to the point where they continued to do so in the face of pain. When the researchers applied an electric shock to the rats' feet in the presence of the food, the rats in the first two groups were frightened away from eating. But the obese rats were not. "Their attention was solely focused on consuming food," says Kenny.

    Assuming that rats and humans are somewhat similar in their responses, this paints a really sickening and embarrassing picture of fat people. Although they are harmed physically by their obesity, they continue at their own detriment. Maybe they really are like the obese rats who continue to eat food in the face of physical pain, when the healthier rats have been scared away.

    • by DoofusOfDeath (636671) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:51AM (#31656384)

      Assuming that rats and humans are somewhat similar in their responses, this paints a really sickening and embarrassing picture of fat people. Although they are harmed physically by their obesity, they continue at their own detriment. Maybe they really are like the obese rats who continue to eat food in the face of physical pain, when the healthier rats have been scared away.

      There might be some other interpretations as well. For example, if the brain chemistry provides such a powerful compulsion, then my sympathy for people in this category goes up, because leaving a donut in the box might be as hard as a coke addict leaving a line on the table.

      Or maybe the obese rates are those that had no self-control to start out with. If that's the case, the severe obesity might simply be a visible indicator of a very real character flaw. (Although I have serious questions about the meaning of "moral failure", if brain chemistry determines a person's actions.)

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Angst Badger (8636)

        Or maybe the obese rates are those that had no self-control to start out with. If that's the case, the severe obesity might simply be a visible indicator of a very real character flaw. (Although I have serious questions about the meaning of "moral failure", if brain chemistry determines a person's actions.)

        Unless you're going to invoke some mythological explanation like a soul, brain structure and chemistry determine all of a person's actions. We may be extremely complex and chaotic (in the formal mathematical sense), but we're still automata, just like everything else in a deterministic universe.

        • by DoofusOfDeath (636671) on Monday March 29, 2010 @10:47AM (#31657136)

          Unless you're going to invoke some mythological explanation like a soul, brain structure and chemistry determine all of a person's actions.

          Until science offers a completely predictive model of behavior and thoughts, it would be premature to assume that a soul (in the classical definition) does or doesn't exist. Just as there are "God in the gaps" belief patterns, there can also be "science in the gaps" belief patterns.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by nine-times (778537)

        It also has possible implications for for the culpability of others in the illness of the obese. With drugs, we might blame the addicts, but then we'd probably also blame the drug dealers and try to throw them in jail. Where does McDonalds stand?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:58AM (#31656480)

      (Posting anonymously in case any future insurance company is reading this.)

      > Although they are harmed physically by their obesity,
      > they continue at their own detriment.

      I'm in a 12-step program for compulsive eating (ceahow.org), recovering since 06-Sep-2002.

      Before program, I was >300lbs (I'm ~6'3"). I used to eat US$25 at McDonald's every meal. Or 2 large delivery pizzas. Or I'd get 2-3 normal person's carry-out dinners and eat those myself.

      Eventually, I was diagnosed with type-II diabetes. I was put on Actos. Actos is an insulin sensitizer which is, IIRC, supposed to make my body better use the insulin my weakened pancreas could produce.

      One of the side effects was, when I binged, my blood sugar would quickly crash and my vision would blur. I couldn't read, had trouble seeing well enough to drive. So I planned my binges on staying home.

      I had physical, tangible proof my behavior was damaging me *every single time I did it* and yet I continued.

      It was about the high.

      When I ignored the craving, concentrated on not eating ("Don't eat don't eat don't eat don't eat"), the pressure would build. I would give in to the craving to simply get rid of the pressure, so I could on with my day. The longer I'd go (hours, usually), the harder I'd snap.

      I know this article shows a single rat study that may or may not be scientific proof of a causal link in humans. All I can say is I see myself in the rats' behavior. I sympathize with what the rats were going through.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by CODiNE (27417)

      I had this buddy who was pretty big, sort of like the captain from Wall-E. I'd seen him eat in many social situations and noticed he ate about the same amount of food I did. Thought it was kind of odd that he'd be so large eating a normal amount of food every time I saw him but... weird.

      Then later another buddy told me the two of them went to a burger place for lunch, and each got a regular hamburger. Then afterwards after they'd said goodbye he noticed him sneak back and buy 2 more burgers.

      So all this t

  • by MikeRT (947531) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:17AM (#31655972) Homepage

    They taste a lot better most of the time than stuff that is good for you without qualification. That keeps your brain cookin with pleasure-inducing chemistry.

    The one thing about these foods that I don't agree with is that the poor need to eat them because they can't afford food that is good for them. That's a load of rubbish. My wife has been able to buy enough good, canned vegetables like beans, chickpeas and corn to feed a family of four for at least a week for $50. You can do a lot with those staples if you try.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by mcgrew (92797) *

      Canning depletes many nutrients, and check the labels -- a lot of canned goods (as well as everything else) have loads of corn syrup. The best way for the poor to eat healthy is to grow a garden; that's what I did when I was poor, and what's more the food tastes a lot better than anything you can buy.

      Second best is the most expensive, that's at the farmer's market.

      After that is frozen; I always thought I hated peas until I ate fresh ones, turns out it's just canned peas I hate, frozen are almost as good as

    • by LordLucless (582312) on Monday March 29, 2010 @11:28AM (#31657818)

      The one thing about these foods that I don't agree with is that the poor need to eat them because they can't afford food that is good for them. That's a load of rubbish.

      It's not because they're cheap. It's because they're cheap and easy. Poorer people generally need to work longer hourers to earn enough to get by. If they're part of a family, then both parents generally need to work in order to support it. It's hard to come home after ten hours on the job to face preparing and cooking a fresh meal.

      Also, canned vegetables are generally artificially sweetened.

  • There, CNN, fixed your headline for you.

  • Funny... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by brian0918 (638904) <brian0918@nOSPAM.gmail.com> on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:27AM (#31656070)
    Funny, I lost 40 lbs eating high-fat low-carb food, purposely not exercising, and eating whenever I was hungry. And my blood pressure went down to normal from its high of 145/95, so I could stop taking blood pressure medication as well. I'm healthier than I've ever been.

    Of course, unlike these rats, I did not eat cheesecake, frosting or other foods high in refined carbs. But this POS study doesn't bother to differentiate between high-fat/high-carb, high-fat/low-carb, etc, let alone about the balance or type of fatty acids present in the food (e.g. grass-fed bacon vs. grain-fed). This is not science, not even close.
    • Re:Funny... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by erroneus (253617) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:43AM (#31656272) Homepage

      Low carb diet is the best diet for losing weight because it works with the body's systems. Carbs are the primary fuel. Take away the primary and it goes to secondary. Be aware of the risks of organ damage and aware of what you intake and you will be fine.

      Problem with the low-carb diet is that it is hard to maintain. HARD to maintain. All casual foods are ridiculously high in carbs. Still, when you can do it, it works every time and works extremely well.

  • I believe the article...food is very addictive. I try and try, but still I keep coming back for food. It's a very persistent addiction. When I try to quit, I get cravings that manifest themselves as dizzyness and gnawing pain in my abdomen. Seemingly the only way to stop the torment is to cave in and eat food. Water is difficult too; I try to tell myself that I don't need it and don't want it anymore but when I finally cave and have a drink of water it feels so refreshing going down that it's like ecstasy.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Wolvenhaven (1521217)
      Your chemical dependence on dihydrogen monoxide sickens me. It kills thousands of people every year, can't you see how horrible it is?
  • As long as you fit within mammals' metabolism (maybe also the Chordate's), the more fats you eat, the fatter you become.
  • by Ukab the Great (87152) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:31AM (#31656120)

    Millions of years of evolution makes animals crave high calorie fatty food and eat as much of it as possible, because they never know when they're going to get the opportunity to do so again. Human beings are no different.

  • Talk about relevance !

    Loud burping while walking around the airport is prohibited in Halstead, Kansas.

  • Watch the online documentary Supersize me ! [google.com] and see (and hear) Morgan Spurlock describe the addictive effects of sugar-rich and fatty food....

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Size_Me [wikipedia.org]

  • Super Size Me... (Score:2, Interesting)

    by operand (15312)

    In the Documentary Super Size Me, several Doctor's noted the same behavior and stated that Fatty Foods found in Fast Food restaurants (McDonald's in this example) were equal to cocaine in terms of addiction.

  • I can't compare... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Akido37 (1473009) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:38AM (#31656198)
    But eating junk food produces a high, a euphoric feeling sometimes. I suppose that's why some foods are called "comfort food".

    I can't compare to drug addiction, because I've never experienced that, but a high is definitely present.

    Sometimes, with my tinfoil hat on, I've wondered if Taco Bell was slipping something addictive into the food that makes me keep coming back.
  • There's a Wikipedia article on the brain's reward system [wikipedia.org]. I've not read the Wiki article but have tried to grasp some of the Berkeley, mit, Yale uni online lectures that speak to it. The problem I had with trying to understand it in general terms is that the system itself isn't fully understood and, for a lay person like myself, it seems there's no difference in the mechanics between the motivations and rewards of a crack whore and a CEO, but that may just be the way it is. What seems to come into play is
  • by _Spirit (23983) on Monday March 29, 2010 @09:46AM (#31656316) Journal

    I think this is another case where the media turn something that might be good: increased understanding of how obesity works, into something bad: telling obese people that they have no control over their behaviour, fueling the "it's no my fault, I have a serious illness" justification for doing nothing to help themselves.

  • As we come to understand more and more about neurology and genetic, an increasing amount of studies on human obesity are shifting from a genetic focus to a neurological focus.

    Dr. David Kessler, former FDA commissioner and someone who has struggled with weight in his own life, has an excellent book out called The End of Overeating: Taking Control of the Insatiable American Appetite [amazon.com]. NPR [wbur.org] has done some very good interviews with him.

    He admits that he started his study expecting to head down the road of genetics

  • by Paul Fernhout (109597) on Monday March 29, 2010 @02:26PM (#31660224) Homepage

    The "Rat Park" experiment showed that addictive behavior results from stress.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rat_Park [wikipedia.org]
    """
    Rat Park was a study into drug addiction conducted in the late 1970s (and published in 1980), by Canadian psychologist Bruce K. Alexander and his colleagues at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada.
        Alexander's hypothesis was that drugs do not cause addiction, and that the apparent addiction to opiate drugs commonly observed in laboratory rats exposed to it is attributable to their living conditions, and not to any addictive property of the drug itself. [1] He told the Canadian Senate in 2001 that prior experiments in which laboratory rats were kept isolated in cramped metal cages, tethered to a self-injection apparatus, show only that "severely distressed animals, like severely distressed people, will relieve their distress pharmacologically if they can." [2]
        To test his hypothesis, Alexander built Rat Park, a 8.8 m2 (95 sq ft) housing colony, 200 times the square footage of a standard laboratory cage. There were 16-20 rats of both sexes in residence, an abundance of food, balls and wheels for play, and enough space for mating and raising litters. [3] The results of the experiment appeared to support his hypothesis. Rats who had been forced to consume morphine hydrochloride for 57 consecutive days were brought to Rat Park and given a choice between plain tap water and water laced with morphine. For the most part, they chose the plain water. "Nothing that we tried," Alexander wrote, "... produced anything that looked like addiction in rats that were housed in a reasonably normal environment." [1] Control groups of rats isolated in small cages consumed much more morphine in this and several subsequent experiments.
        The two major science journals, Science and Nature, rejected Alexander, Coambs, and Hadaway's first paper, which appeared instead in Psychopharmacology, a respectable but much smaller journal in 1978. The paper's publication initially attracted no response. [4] Within a few years, Simon Fraser University withdrew Rat Park's funding.
    """

    Many people in today's industrialized society are under a lot of stress. Creating healthier communities may help reduce addictive behavior. One example of how to do that is here:
        "About the AARP/Bluezones Vitality Project"
        http://www.bluezones.com/makeover-about [bluezones.com]

    Another is here:
        "Surviving America's Depression Epidemic: How to Find Morale, Energy, and Community in a World Gone Crazy"
      http://books.google.com/books?id=bCuC2H-6k_8C [google.com]

    Vitamin D deficiency from being indoors too much also contributes to obesity and depression.
        http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/treatment.shtml [vitamindcouncil.org]

    For more on breaking out of a "pleasure trap" leading to obesity, see these:
        http://www.healthpromoting.com/Articles/articles/PleasureTrap.htm [healthpromoting.com]
        http://www.amazon.com/Pleasure-Trap-Mastering-Undermines-Happiness/dp/1570671508 [amazon.com]
        http://www.amazon.com/Supernormal-Stimuli-Overran-Evolutionary-Purpose/dp/039306848X [amazon.com]

"Well hello there Charlie Brown, you blockhead." -- Lucy Van Pelt

Working...