Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Space Science

India Moves To Put Its First Man In Space By 2016 242

Posted by timothy
from the but-he's-gotta-be-way-too-old dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this snippet from the International Business Times: "India plans to launch its first manned space mission in 2016, moving to become the fourth nation to put a man in space. Space scientists and senior officials of the state-run ISRO are preparing a pre-project report to build the infrastructure and facilities for the mission, estimated to cost a $2.76 billion. 'We are planning a human space flight in 2016, with two astronauts who will spend seven days in the Earth's lower orbit,' Radhakrishnan told reporters at ISRO headquarters in Bangalore. In September, India's Chandrayaan-1 satellite discovered water on the moon, boosting India's credibility among established space-faring nations"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

India Moves To Put Its First Man In Space By 2016

Comments Filter:
  • by ACK!! (10229) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @03:38PM (#30922558) Journal
    But I am not doubting the intent. In fact, it is refreshing to see a nation not simply looking at short term but thinking in terms of long term goals but in a concrete way. Its a great thing to have the community of nations dedicated to space exploration expanding in any case.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by toppavak (943659)
      Not disagreeing with the sentiment of your post, but its really sad that 6 years now qualifies as long-term vision. One would hope that governments would always plan for the future, but I guess its one consequence of the evolving nature of democracy / republics that governments no longer seem to be often able to look past current politicians' terms in office.
      • by Sir_Lewk (967686)

        I think a lot of it has to do with how we percieve numbers and time. I still often catch myself thinking of "one decade ago" as "1990". Anything more than a year or two from now seems a long time away.

    • by FleaPlus (6935)

      2016 for India (at a cost of $2.76 billion) seems like a long way off, but it should be noted that NASA's similarly-capable Ares I isn't expected to be ready to launch people until 2017-2019 at a cost of ~$40 billion. The Ares I has also been under development since 2005, while the Indian launch plans have just been announced.

      Then again, fixed-price commercial capsules from the United Launch Alliance or SpaceX (on their already-proven rockets [orlandosentinel.com] like the Atlas V) would be ready 2013-2015 if they received a few

    • But I am not doubting the intent. In fact, it is refreshing to see a nation not simply looking at short term but thinking in terms of long term goals but in a concrete way.

      Are they looking at concrete goals in a long term way - or is this just India's latest entry in the regional and global dick size contest they been pursuing so intensely? I see no reason to assume they they are, unlike any other spacefaring nation, pursuing the former rather than, like every other spacefaring nation, the latter.

  • by TheDarkMinstrel (1671156) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @03:43PM (#30922690)
    The US will be able to outsource space exploration overseas!!! Oh goody.
    • And the thousands of Nasa engineers will have a place to work... in India. See? It all works out for the best.
  • US: Astronauts; Russia: Cosmonauts; China: Taikonauts; India: ?

    --Greg

    • by denis-The-menace (471988) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @04:00PM (#30923098)

      easy - punjabinauts

    • Vizvanauts?
    • by radtea (464814)

      Americans, Britons, Canadians, Russians, Chinese, Japanese, Sri Lankan, Egyptian, Indian... etc... people who crew boats are called "sailors". Likewise, people from all nations who fly planes are called "pilots" or "aircrew".

      Why anyone thinks the nationality of a human being in space is so important that we ought to have 200 different words for "human being in space" is beyond me. This kind of petty nationalism may have served a purpose during the Cold War. Today it just tells us that if people are doing

      • by vlm (69642)

        Americans, Britons, Canadians, Russians, Chinese, Japanese, Sri Lankan, Egyptian, Indian... etc... people who crew boats are called "sailors".

        Actually, in Japanese, the word for "boat crew" is not the English word "sailor".

        Likewise, people from all nations who fly planes are called "pilots" or "aircrew".

        What about the use of the word "Kamikaze" by American journalists and historians?

        Why anyone thinks the nationality of a human being in space is so important that we ought to have 200 different words for "human being in space" is beyond me.

        It would be a heroic achievement to just standardize chemical element names. Aluminium vs aluminum. Tungsten vs Wolfrum. For some real fun, try applying a universal international standard to weights and measures, or screw threads.

        • by daveime (1253762)

          For some real fun, try applying a universal international standard to weights and measures

          Erm, the Metric System ? AFAIK, the whole world EXCEPT for USA and some crappy island in the middle of nowhere use it.

        • by radtea (464814)

          Actually, in Japanese, the word for "boat crew" is not the English word "sailor".

          When Japanese sailors are referred to by English speakers they are described as "sailors", not as the Japanese term. But "taikinaut" is an English word, not a Chinese word. "Naut" is a latin suffix for "traveller". Chinese typically generates words for new concepts by simple combinations of existing words, so there is a generic word for "wheeled vehicle" and various added words for different kinds--I believe "automobile" is

          • The weird practice that there be a different English word for every nation's astronauts just reflects the strange place the space program resides in: a political and cultural bauble, not an essential activity for the future of the human race. It's sad.

            Sad, but not surprising. Look at how we, as a culture, have treated so-called "big science." As soon as the [elitist snob]unwashed masses[/es], and particularly politicians, think that Fermi, or our various other big research labs, can come up with a solution for something, or create a fancy new toy for the Pentagon, they're willing to invest, but only the minimum, and feel it their right to demand a solution ASAP. They fail, however, to understand that such research labs need funding of a significant amoun

      • by tibman (623933)

        Yeah but i think even if an American Civilian built his own space ship and orbited the earth several times from space.. he could not be called an 'Astronaut'. That is a titled bestowed by NASA like knighthood and the Queen or something.

      • by elrous0 (869638) *
        Yeah, what's with all these countries speaking different languages? Can't we just agree on one?
    • "The word is derived from the Sanskrit Jaganntha[1] (meaning "Lord of the Universe") which is one of the many names of Krishna from the ancient Vedic scriptures of India." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juggernaut [wikipedia.org]

      Seems like a perfect fit to me.

      In other news, Greece has reconfirmed its plans to send men into space, choosing to call them Argonauts. However, critics cite that their plans are "a few thousand years" behind schedule, and technical experts are skeptical of the viability of sheep skin space suits

      • I like Juggernaut but have a secret preference for Sivanaut (I realize I'm being narrow here), but I do like the concept. The dance of creation and destruction all in one. Sounds like the greater universe of space to me.

    • by vbraga (228124)

      From wikipedia [wikipedia.org]:

      The Indian Space Research Organisation plans its first manned space flight for 2015 and is looking to recruit vyomanauts (pronounced veeohma).

  • This is great news (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Hazelfield (1557317) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @03:54PM (#30922974)
    The more alternatives for manned space flight, the less dependent we become on the space agency of one single nation. An agency that battles not only technical difficulties but also perpetual budget problems.

    I hope for more international cooperation in the future. Sending up your own astronauts gets your country a fair bit of prestige. Sending up astronauts from other nations also gets you friends.
  • Good for them! (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Timewasted (1731254)
    It is a good thing (IMHO) to see more countries developing their own space programs to send their own astronauts to space. To my knowledge, only Russia, U.S. and China have programs that have done so.

    Competition always fosters excellence in all areas of academics & sciences.
  • 3 cheers for India! (Score:3, Interesting)

    by gestalt_n_pepper (991155) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @04:53PM (#30924320)

    Let's hope they can make something sustainable and profitable (Hint: Manned space-based low earth orbit solar power stations are where the money is going to be guys).

  • One datum to connect the report from TFA (and sadly but in fact detracting from it) and that elsewhere that the Obama budget contains no funding for Constellation:

    If India launches people into space in 2016 it'll be the 4th nation but the 5th organization to do so. After China's manned orbital flights but before India's planned missions, two pilots earned their astronaut wings flying SpaceShipOne. TFA says they plan to stay a week, but the title does just say 'space'. After the Rutan Clan, every nation the

    • If India launches people into space in 2016 it'll be the 4th nation but the 5th organization to do so. After China's manned orbital flights but before India's planned missions, two pilots earned their astronaut wings flying SpaceShipOne. TFA says they plan to stay a week, but the title does just say 'space'. After the Rutan Clan, every nation the sends up a space mission will be 'after a private company'.

      You know what's different between SpaceShipOne and everyone else on your list?

      SpaceShipOne didn't get into orbit. It was just a really tall hop above the planet surface, but that's it. Going from there to orbit is a large step.

  • Is it certain that they have selected a man, rather than a woman - and if so, why? Is it advantageous to have a penis in space?
  • by Guppy (12314) on Wednesday January 27, 2010 @10:57PM (#30929074)

    It is a common error to delude oneself into believing the trappings of power and strength are power and strength themselves. You see it all the time, when folks fritter away their home equity loans on big-vroom SUVs and fancy appliances, allowing ourselves the delusion (for a temporary while) that we've still "got it made", as long as they have these things around them. In truth, had we the wisdom to forgo these external symbols of a comfortable existence, the American Dream would be much more alive today.

    I perceive the response to the U.S. withdrawl from manned space exploration in much the same way. "Asia is taking the lead because they're still launching Spam-in-a-Can into space! Therefore, we need to launch more Spam-in-a-Can, and it will make us stronger!" I find there's a certain cargo-cult mistaking of which was cause, and which was effect. In the past, we have had a great deal of technological innovations associated with the space exploration program -- but it is a mistake to think because we're launching rockets we're driving innovation. It is was exactly the other way around; because we had a such strong base in engineering and science we were able to create the technologies to launch those rockets.

    China and India's increasing economic and technological competence are what have allowed them to take the lead now, and it's a mistake to think that we can stay ahead if we just keep up with appearances. We can play mid-life crisis and blow our remaining resources on the equivalent of a fancy sports car, and make-believe we're still a studly, vigorous nation. But to the rest of the world, we just look increasingly ridiculous.

"No problem is so formidable that you can't walk away from it." -- C. Schulz

Working...