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Science

LHC Reaches Record Energy 347

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the spinning-and-spinning dept.
toruonu writes "Yesterday evening the Large Hadron Collider at CERN for the first time accelerated protons in both directions of the ring to 1.18 TeV. Even though the 1 TeV barrier per beam was first broken a week ago, this marks the first time that the beam was in the machine in both directions at the same time, allowing possibly for collisions at a center of mass energy of 2.36 TeV. Although the test lasted mere minutes, it was enough to have detectors record the very first events at 2.36 TeV. LHC passes Tevatron (the particle collider at Fermilab that operates at 1.96 TeV) and becomes the highest energy particle collider in the world (so far it was effectively just the highest energy storage ring...)"
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LHC Reaches Record Energy

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  • Doom (Score:4, Funny)

    by 2names (531755) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:10AM (#30377092)
    Doom, I tell you. It's coming for all of us.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by oldspewey (1303305)

      What the hell? Is this for real?

      I don't know what's freakier - the idea that this is some kind of covert human activity, or that humans aren't involved in any way.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Vohar (1344259)

        I did some digging but couldn't find an article on any "real" news sites. From Google it's showing on conspiracy sites, blogs, and social sites. Didn't find anything searching major news outlets.

        I'm guessing hoax at this point. I would think that the major news outlets would all be jumping to get on this first...unless they're just being cautious too, and want to fact-check first. ...though lack of fact-checking rarely stops US news...

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Ch_Omega (532549)
          http://spaceweather.com/ [spaceweather.com] mentions it..
        • by juletre (739996)
          ..or so the theory goes. Norway's largest newspapers all did stories on this earlier today. Here is from one of them: Vg.no [www.vg.no], and here is another dagbladet.no [dagbladet.no].

          The first image from vg is taken with a long shutter time (or long exposure, or what the english expression is) on a tripod.
          americans might consider these newspapers NSFW. Most norwegian ads contain a fair amount of tits and ass. just sayin'.
          • by Wannabe Code Monkey (638617) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @03:40PM (#30379960)

            Man, I am loving these Norwegian news sites. It looks like English and Norwegian have some similar words due to their common Germanic origin. But what's interesting is the fact that there seem to be many more false friends [wikipedia.org], which makes for amazing headlines like this one: "Innbrudd hos Nicky Hilton - Jeg hater folk som stjeler, twitrer søstera Paris". Which of course I interpret as "Inbred hos Nicky Hilton and her sister Paris hate folks who twitter".

    • by Sockatume (732728)

      I was sceptical after looking at the first link, but those images really convinced me.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by bill_mcgonigle (4333) *

      they've put in an anti-Slashdot referer rule on those images - was there an original article so we don't have to copy & paste?

      • they've put in an anti-Slashdot referer rule on those images - was there an original article so we don't have to copy & paste?

        http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3238877 [somethingawful.com]

      • by solevita (967690)

        they've put in an anti-Slashdot referer rule on those images - was there an original article so we don't have to copy & paste?

        Just click the link then hit F5 when it won't load. No referrers on a refresh...

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by JesseMcDonald (536341)

        Why not try this Firefox extension: RefControl [mozilla.org]. You can set it to block the referer (equivalent to copying & pasting the URL) or, even better, set it to the URL you're visiting, which gets around attempts to block direct links. This is, as one of the commenters put it, "One of the essential addons for Firefox. "

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Rigrig (922033)

        How about you click the link, get the error image, then press enter in the address bar?
        Works for me (firefox 3.5)

      • by hvm2hvm (1208954)
        took me about 20seconds to copy paste and look at all of them. some times just do the thing, it's not worth it trying to find a simpler or better way of doing it.
    • http://gfx.nrk.no/YOYD2X1CgNBSeaPse9LjVwT6ymkkphv7Q7x0aibAWJwg.jpg [gfx.nrk.no]

      as evidenced by the trail from over the horizon. Note the wind shear... Sorry, Russia. Denial denied!
  • by Yvan256 (722131) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:19AM (#30377184) Homepage Journal

    So I says, "Super collider? I just met her!" And then they built the super collider. Thank you, you've been a great audience. - Humorbot 5.0

  • Higgs (Score:4, Informative)

    by toruonu (1696670) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:23AM (#30377220)
    The most optimistic scenario for Higgs discovery would take a few years of running. But there are plenty of other theories to test that can show their first signs already after a few months of running in physics configuration (7 TeV or 10 TeV energy that'll probably be around in January/February). Things like supersymmetry, lepton flavor violation etc.
    • Re:Higgs (Score:5, Funny)

      by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:27AM (#30377264) Journal
      Are you absolutely sure that "Lepton flavor violation" isn't some sort of horribly translated import-only hentai?
    • One year of design energy running. At 14 TeV and design luminosity, the LHC will deliver 10/fb of data to each experiment per year. Either CMS or ATLAS can discover the Higgs at 5 sigma across nearly the entire available mass range with 10/fb, and with much less data for many masses. In combination (like CDF and D0 do now), it would take even less data for ATLAS and CMS to discover it together.

      Of course, that's assuming that commissioning goes well in the next year. I believe the LHC is currently on s
  • Those Atlas collision displays would make an awesome computer desktop gadget if you could get timely updates from a central server. Maybe add in some sound effects like "boing-oing-oing!" on each update.
  • The LHC becomes the first particle accelerator to collide protons at energies twice the speed of the tevatron!
    • by JamesP (688957)

      Actually the speed is pretty much the same, because of relativistic effects...

      So instead of "double" it's another 9 as in "the speed is 99,9999% instead of 99,999% of the speed of light"

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by bill_mcgonigle (4333) *

      The LHC becomes the first particle accelerator to collide protons at energies twice the speed of the tevatron!

      Please explain the Google service or iPhone tie-in.

  • by LWATCDR (28044) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:24AM (#30377234) Homepage Journal

    A herd of Lamas have escaped a local zoo and nibbled on the Christmas lights at CERN. The short caused the cooling system to go off line and the LHC will be off line for five months.

  • Yes, but are we any closer to using it to shoot pigeons?

  • by jd2112 (1535857) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:28AM (#30377268)
    You only need about 0.5mA to send a DeLorian back in time!
  • Jiggawatts (Score:2, Funny)

    by sagematt (1251956)
    Dammit Slashdot, at least learn to use Jiggawatts instead of TeV or whichever crazy measure Europeans have, don't forget about your American audience!
  • Still? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Interoperable (1651953) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:39AM (#30377374)
    I've been following the LHC's progress fairly closely because I find the project absolutely fascinating. On the other hand, I think /. might be overdoing it a bit regarding news on the subject. Half the summary was devoted to explaining what exactly was different from the last posting. As all of the previous posting have explained, it will be a few months before anything truly exciting happens and years after that before the first really valuable scientific discoveries start occurring. Much of the discussion has become: "Are we there yet?" "No." "How about now?" "No." "And now?" "Still no."
    • by Oxygen99 (634999)
      I take your point, but the Large Hadron Collider is the pre-eminent technological achievement of our civilisation. It knocks the complexity of the moon landings into a cocked hat and operates at energy frequencies intended to rip the very fabric of space apart. It's the most complicated and wondrous machine ever built by our, and possibly by any species, and we're doing all this to understand the processes that govern life, the universe and everything.

      That, my friend, is what gods do.

      I think a little
      • They are smashing rocks together..... really tiny rocks.... reallllly fast. It isn't complex from that angle.
    • Re:Still? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by drsquare (530038) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @12:06PM (#30377672)

      On the other hand, I think /. might be overdoing it a bit regarding news on the subject.

      If a few years back we could have an article every time WoW gained a subscriber, or every time someone at Google farted, or some pirate got busted, I think we can have an article when a particle physics record is broken.

  • by HigH5 (1242290) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:49AM (#30377494)
    ... LHC also broke the record for working for the longest uninterrupted time.
  • Bah. (Score:4, Funny)

    by sootman (158191) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:53AM (#30377538) Homepage Journal

    Yesterday evening the Large Hadron Collider at CERN for the first time accelerated protons in both directions of the ring to 1.18 TeV

    640GeV ought to be enough for anybody.

  • by alephnull42 (202254) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @11:58AM (#30377590) Homepage Journal
    in standard media units
    - Two female mosquitos colliding at 1.652 km/h? http://lhc-machine-outreach.web.cern.ch/lhc-machine-outreach/lhc_glossary.htm [web.cern.ch]
    - An unladen African swallow falling off a grain of sand?
    - The calorific value of 1 cornflake unleashed over the space of a fortnight?
    • by mea37 (1201159)

      Your third bullet conflates energy with power. You could put it in terms of the calorific value of 1 cornflake (that would be energy, which is also what eV measure), but time has nothing to do with it.

      Anyway, 2.36 TeV = 3.78 * 10^-7 J

      So if my math is right, that's about enough to heat a shot glass of water by 1/10,000,000 of a degree C.

    • by Thud457 (234763)
      - the amount of energy required to move 2.36 Libraries of Congress through a electric field potential of 1 volt.
      or to move 1 Library of Congress through a electric field potential of 2.36 volts.
      (I never realized LCs were charged particles before...)
  • the 1 TeV barrier per beam was first broken a week ago

    That is not a barrier, that is a record.

    A barrier is something that provides actual resistance. The speed of sound is a barrier. The speed of light is a barrier. AFAIK, there is no barrier at 1 TeV.

    • by Chris Burke (6130)

      Here's a nit: Words are often used figuratively.

      • Nah. I don’t buy that explanation, in this case.

        They used “barrier” to describe a limit that was based on “we didn’t spend the money to build a powerful enough accelerator to achieve 1 TeV per beam until just now.” That’s not a barrier, it’s a record.

        A barrier is located where your marginal rate of increase exhibits a local minimum.

  • Just tell us when you find the Higgs Boson. We don't care about every .1 increase in TeV

  • by pz (113803) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @01:39PM (#30378714) Journal

    The summary makes it sound like there's some immense wall that must be climed or broken in order to pass 1 TeV. There is no barrier at 1 TeV, but rather an arbitrary threshold put there by humans because the numeric representation of that energy level has a lot of zeros in the scale we happen to use. LHC did not pass a barrier, but a threshold.

    This is science, and important science, so it's critical to get it right. Especially so for the non-scientific public.

  • Webcam (Score:4, Funny)

    by elmartinos (228710) on Wednesday December 09, 2009 @03:41PM (#30379972) Homepage

    Webcam from the LHC is here [cyriak.co.uk]

It's later than you think, the joint Russian-American space mission has already begun.

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