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Chimp Found Plotting Against Zoo Guests 435

Posted by samzenpus
from the give-em-hell-Santino dept.
rjshirts writes "In further proof that Planet of the Apes is coming to pass, researchers in Stockholm, Sweden have proof that primates can plan ahead. From the article: 'Santino the chimpanzee's anti-social behavior stunned both visitors and keepers at the Furuvik Zoo but fascinated researchers because it was so carefully prepared. According to a report in the journal Current Biology, the 31-year-old alpha male started building his weapons cache in the morning before the zoo opened, collecting rocks and knocking out disks from concrete boulders inside his enclosure. He waited until around midday before he unleashed a "hailstorm" of rocks against visitors, the study said.'"

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Chimp Found Plotting Against Zoo Guests

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  • Translation (Score:5, Insightful)

    by grub (11606) <slashdot@grub.net> on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @04:44PM (#27156801) Homepage Journal

    Translation: "I'm an intelligent primate who doesn't like being caged up for your amusement."
    • by IAR80 (598046) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @04:49PM (#27156885) Homepage
      And they call me anti-social next they are going to call me a communist.
      • by CaptainPatent (1087643) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:09PM (#27157185) Journal

        And they call me anti-social next they are going to call me a communist.

        But doesn't anti-socialism lead to anti-communism?

    • by Capt. Cooley (1438063) <mizo.razer@NoSpaM.gmail.com> on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @04:51PM (#27156917) Journal
      Intelligent? Maybe. Good aim? Definitely not. He didn't even seriously injure anyone. This is news why?
      • Re:Translation (Score:5, Informative)

        by khellendros1984 (792761) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @04:55PM (#27156971) Journal
        Because it's an aspect of chimpanzee intelligence that hadn't previously been observed, apparently. One of the key differences between humans and animals is that humans have a much more advanced ability to predict what will happen in the future and to make preparations to deal with that prediction.
        In this case, the chimp remembered that people were outside of his cage on other days, and realized that that would probably be true again. He prepared for that prediction. Animals just don't tend to plan ahead, and it's exciting that this one did.
        • "In this case, the chimp remembered that people were outside of his cage on other days, and realized that that would probably be true again. He prepared for that prediction. Animals just don't tend to plan ahead, and it's exciting that this one did."

          You mean like when elephants come back to the same grazing area year after year?

          • by NeutronCowboy (896098) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:05PM (#27157131)

            No. Elephants don't bring sticks and rocks to scare away lions they regularly meet at yearly watering holes.

            This involved:
            - detection of arbitrary cycles
            - planning for how to deal with them
            - relatively elaborate creation of tools to support plan

            Pretty exciting stuff indeed.

            • by sakdoctor (1087155) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:13PM (#27157247) Homepage

              Pretty impress CV; I'd hire him.

              • by publiclurker (952615) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:15PM (#27157263)
                You get to hire your own management? I'm impressed.
              • by flyingsquid (813711) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:45PM (#27157775)
                Arguably, he demonstrated more foresight and planning than the primates running the investment banks on Wall Street.
                • by uniquename72 (1169497) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @06:22PM (#27158263)
                  Memo to Daswolfen:
                  This post is funny while your is a troll. You're probably wondering why, so I thought I'd explain.

                  You see, the article was about the foresight and planning of a chimp. Therefore, when flyingsquid made reference to foresight and planning in his post and related these traits to Wall Street bankers, it was amusing.

                  Had he simply said, "Better qualified than a Wall Street banker", then appended a long diatribe explaining why he's not a racist, it would not have been funny.

                  As you may have already inferred (but probably haven't) the humor comes from creating relationships in the reader's mind between a chimp and a banker, first by stating several qualities displayed by the chimp, then by relating that to bankers.

                  If you had said instead, "Arguably, he demonstrated more foresight and planning than the primate who wrote the Federal budget," that may have been read as racist, and you may have still been flamed, but at least you would have displayed some humor (as well as an ability to connect both the president, a chimp, and the recent dust-up over that cartoon). We might then have appreciated your post as more than, well, you simply being a douche.

                  I hope this helps make your future contributions to slashdot more productive and enjoyable.
                • by dtml-try MyNick (453562) <`moc.liamg' `ta' `narehtil'> on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @06:27PM (#27158329)

                  Arguably, he demonstrated more foresight and planning than the primates running the investment banks on Wall Street.

                  This is that far from the truth as you might think ;)
                  A while ago a Dutch TV show did a experiment on this very subject.

                  They had let a group of apes handpick a bunch of stocks and let a group of notable bankers do the same.

                  After 1 month the apes had yielded a higher net profit then the bankers did.....

                  Of course this was for shits and giggles but very funny nontheless.

                  • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

                    by ravenshrike (808508)
                    Bankers or stockbrokers? Because they're very different. You'd expect bankers to look for a relatively conservative growth model, which means there's a perfectly good chance that over the short term the chimps picks would outperform the bankers. Over the long term this wouldn't tend to be true.
                    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

                      by turing_m (1030530)

                      Bankers or stockbrokers? Because they're very different. You'd expect bankers to look for a relatively conservative growth model

                      Bankers of which era? Recent bankers haven't been very conservative.

                • by StarkRG (888216) <starkrg@gm[ ].com ['ail' in gap]> on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @07:01PM (#27158817)

                  Woah, woah, woah. You're saying that lending enormous amounts of money with extremely high interest rates to people who can't possibly afford to pay it back is a bad idea? Since when? Next you're going to tell me that trickle-down economics doesn't work and that two plus two doesn't equal five (even for very large values of two)! You obviously aren't an economics major.

            • by fishbowl (7759) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @06:37PM (#27158447)

              >This involved:
              >- detection of arbitrary cycles
              >- planning for how to deal with them
              >- relatively elaborate creation of tools to support plan

              I would even speculate that there is an element of "avoiding being caught executing the plan."
              Does that imply a guilty conscience to some degree, or only fear of his handlers?

            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              by Ashriel (1457949)

              Pretty exciting stuff indeed.

              Maybe if it had been a bear. Monkeys in general show very strong signs of human-level intelligence. They're pretty much on par with our children.

              For those of you reading this who are interested in watching a short video showing just how smart monkeys are, check out this TED piece on Bonobos. [ted.com]

        • Re:Translation (Score:5, Insightful)

          by MichaelSmith (789609) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:16PM (#27157281) Homepage Journal

          Because it's an aspect of chimpanzee intelligence that hadn't previously been observed, apparently.

          Years ago I read about some animal sanctuary where they were trying to keep chimpanzees in captivity. They had to run the place like a real jail for humans. If you forget to lock a door in (say) the elephant enclosure at the zoo you would be okay for a while. Not so with chimps.

          I am surprised that anybody is surprised by this. Chimpanzees are nasty scheming vicious murderous animals. Just like us.

          • Re:Translation (Score:5, Insightful)

            by interkin3tic (1469267) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @06:01PM (#27158015)

            Years ago I read about some animal sanctuary where they were trying to keep chimpanzees in captivity. They had to run the place like a real jail for humans. If you forget to lock a door in (say) the elephant enclosure at the zoo you would be okay for a while. Not so with chimps.

            I am surprised that anybody is surprised by this.

            I think the key here is that the chimp anticipated future events and planned rather than just showing an understanding of the current situation, which are dramatically different capabilities. A chimp realizing the door is unlocked is one thing, that is interesting enough given what we usually think of non-human intelligence (I'd say ignorance rather than arrogance, I'm not around a lot of chimps). It's another to demonstrate that the chimp can forecast events that haven't occoured yet, this is something that humans seem barely capable of.

            Maybe something in TFA backs me up on this... Holy crap, suprise of suprises, IT DOES!

            "These observations convincingly show that our fellow apes do consider the future in a very complex way," said the author of the report, Lund University Ph.D. student Mathias Osvath. "It implies that they have a highly developed consciousness, including lifelike mental simulations of potential events."...

            The observations confirmed the result of a staged laboratory experiment reported in 2006 by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. In that case orangutans and bonobos were able to figure out which tool would work in an effort to retrieve grapes, and were able to remember to bring that tool along hours later.

            To be honest, I'm suprised that you're suprised that people who study chimps are suprised by this. These seem to be people who know chimps pretty well, if this were an old result, you'd think they wouldn't be wasting their time. Whenever I've thought an expert in a field I don't know as well is wasting their time, I usually come to realize that I was actually not understanding the situation.

          • Re:Translation (Score:5, Interesting)

            by Knowbuddy (21314) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @06:43PM (#27158549) Homepage Journal

            Any zookeeper who has ever worked primates would tell you that this is pretty typical.

            My wife worked as a keeper at a prominent chimp and orangutan sanctuary for several years. She would come home with tales that would make your skin crawl of how smart the apes (both chimps and orangutans) are. It turns out that the OUs (you don't say "orangs", as it offends some of the more hard-core keepers) are the more cunning of the two -- she likened them to engineers.

            Some examples:

            • An orangutan who kept a bit of metal in between his bottom lip and teeth, using it to try to pick the locks at night when the keepers weren't around. After they finally caught him doing it, they went back and reviewed the tapes and saw that he'd been at it for weeks.
            • An orangutan who threw her baby onto the hotwire (electrified fence) to use as an insulating glove to get herself over it.
            • An orangutan who used a sweater in the same hotwire-insulating capacity. (OUs love sweaters, shirts, and dresses.)
            • Chimpanzees that would hear people approaching, then position themselves just close enough to the walkway to be able to urinate and/or masturbate onto the guests (generally not the keepers).
            • An orangutan who used a hard plastic toy to chip away at the concrete substrate (foundation) of his enclosure for days, until he finally managed to get to the bare rebar beneath.

            Did you know that the apes you see in TV ads (such as CareerBuilder) and films (such as Dunston Checks In) are never more than 3 or 4 years old, but have a lifespan only a little shorter than humans? They're only "cute" when they are very young, and quickly become uncontrollable, no matter how well-trained they are -- precisely because they have that kind of intelligence. (Roughly that of a 4- to 6-year-old child.)

            After that, they are retired and put in cages (rarely zoos) for the rest of their lives. The entertainers wash their hands of them, then your tax dollars are spent to maintain them for the next 40+ years. Depending on the facility, this can be as much as $20,000USD per ape per year.

            So every time you see a "funny monkey video", think about how much of your paycheck is going to support that ape in a few years.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by nobdoor (1496229)
          It's arrogant and naive to think humans have a 'much more advanced ability to think ahead' than animals.

          Animals just don't tend to plan ahead"

          Please. Any kid with a subscription to zoobooks can tell you about arctic foxes burying portions of a kill for later use during winter. And what other animal has raped and exploited nature for its own immediate gains? Lets see where global warming takes us, then I'll ask you how good we are at 'thinking ahead'.

          • Re:Translation (Score:5, Informative)

            by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:43PM (#27157735) Journal
            The tricky bit, when trying to study animal cognition(or lack thereof, depending on the instance) is distinguishing between things that aren't cognition; but look like it, and things that actually are.

            In the fox case, for instance, the fox might be thinking ahead, and storing food for the future, or foxes might have a "when not hungry, bury available food" instinct. This doesn't mean that the fox isn't planning ahead; but you can't tell one way or the other.

            Thus, researchers are always on the lookout for situations that can distinguish between the two. Novel situations where instincts wouldn't be expected to apply, pathological situations where instincts would fail if applied, etc.
            • by Al Al Cool J (234559) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @09:57PM (#27161011)

              Thus, researchers are always on the lookout for situations that can distinguish between the two. Novel situations where instincts wouldn't be expected to apply, pathological situations where instincts would fail if applied, etc.

              I wonder, do researchers do this instinctively or is it a cognitive process? If they are always on the lookout for these situations, then that suggests to me that it is instinctive, and that these instincts have helped lead them to succeed as researchers.

          • Re:Translation (Score:5, Insightful)

            by v1 (525388) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:48PM (#27157819) Homepage Journal

            Any kid with a subscription to zoobooks can tell you about arctic foxes burying portions of a kill for later use during winter.

            There is a VERY important difference here. Arctic foxes don't survive through a few winters without a food cache and think "hey I bet it's going to do that again next year, maybe I should stash some food this summer so I have more to eat next winter?". Evolution has taught them to do that. Same as any other instinctual behavior in any other animal. Babies don't learn to suck the tit.

            These chimps identified a pattern, and prepared in advance to benefit themselves when they expected it to repeat. Gathering rocks in the morning to attack tourists in the afternoon is not evolutionary adaptation. Something like that could become an evolutionary behavioral adaptation, but not from 100 years of zoos.

        • Yesterday we brought the pet carrier out from the basement and as soon as the cat saw it she hid behind the sofa. Predicting what will happen next is something any mammal can learn. That's not what this story is about. It's about planning tool use for the future.
          • Re:Translation (Score:4, Insightful)

            by SydShamino (547793) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:48PM (#27157813)

            Recognizing a scary object is not the same thing as remembering that a scary object might appear at a certain interval. If you're cat remembered that you took it to the vet on March 10, 2008, too, and it hid in the garage yesterday for that reason, then you'd have a scientific breakthrough.

            • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

              by Swizec (978239)
              You can't even expect a human to remember what happened on "today" last year and you want something with a brain the size of a tennis ball to do it?
              • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

                by ChadM (102789)

                Ok I giggled. If your cat has a brain the size of a tennis ball then it's got a huge fucking head.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by ross.w (87751)
            Your cat's smarter than ours. When we bring the cat carrier out, he wants to explore it. When he does, we shut him in. Works every time and he hasn't figured it out yet.
        • Re:Translation (Score:4, Interesting)

          by BikeHelmet (1437881) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:33PM (#27157581) Journal

          Animals just don't tend to plan ahead, and it's exciting that this one did.

          I wonder what all the animals that prepare to hibernate in the winter would think of your statement?

          Regardless, this may interest you: http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/09/09/1825206 [slashdot.org]

          A parrot (now dead) that understood cause and effect. If he answered a question correctly, like counting the number of blocks of a certain colour, he was allowed a treat. (only if he asked for it)

          If he got it wrong, no treat. Apparently he learned not to ask for treats after getting the answer wrong, which unless I'm mistaken (quite likely - I'm not an expert :P ) means he also re-examined his answers after giving them.

          Pretty smart bird. Doesn't really surprise me that a genetically closer mammal was able to prepare for a future event.

          • Re:Translation (Score:5, Interesting)

            by Shihar (153932) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:51PM (#27157865)

            I wonder what all the animals that prepare to hibernate in the winter would think of your statement?

            You are under the assumption that it is planning that causes an animal to prepare to hibernate and not pure instinct leading them by the nose.

            You don't eat because you realize that if don't various mechanisms in your body are going to fail. You eat because you are hungry. The same is true for hibernation, mating, and a pile of other "planned" behaviors. Two deer don't bang in the fall because they realize that this is their chance to make babies and if they miss the window they will have none. They got at it because they are horny.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by techess (1322623)

          One of my favorite articles showing that animals plan ahead:

          http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1543432/Birds-not-so-stupid-after-all.html [telegraph.co.uk]

          And birds are often considered "stupid" compared to primates.

      • Re:Translation (Score:4, Insightful)

        by snowraver1 (1052510) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @04:59PM (#27157037)
        I don't think that the monkey had that bad of aim. He managed to hit people from their cage described by TFA as: "The attacks were only directed at humans viewing the apes across the moat surrounding the island compound where they were held."

        I don't know how many people I could hit from across a moat. Just saying...
        • Re:Translation (Score:5, Informative)

          by TheRealMindChild (743925) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @06:13PM (#27158175) Homepage Journal
          Hate to be the one to bring this up, but a Chimpanzee is an Ape, not a Monkey.
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Stray7Xi (698337)

          I don't think that the monkey had that bad of aim.

          Chimps aren't monkeys. They're apes.
          ...I'm only saying because your mom doesn't like being called a monkey.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by angel'o'sphere (80593)

          Chimps are very bad in hand / eye coordination.

          If you make experiments where they have to throw something at a 1 yard big target, 10 yards far away, they splatter the whole area 10 yards left and right of the target. Basically the same is true for distance.

          Chimps "love" to throw stuff at others, other chimps or leopards or what ever seems threatening ... but they don't throw stuff during hunting, because they basically never hit anything (and you can not train them to hit).

          angel'o'sphere

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by negRo_slim (636783)

        Intelligent? Maybe. Good aim? Definitely not. He didn't even seriously injure anyone. This is news why?

        The morning radio show mentioned this today. Said he broke a couple arms, gave a few concussions and one guy is still "knocked out"...

      • by Locke2005 (849178) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:15PM (#27157265)
        You're assuming he was actually trying to hit someone. Watching humans scream with panic and run away when you throw things at them is funny! Watching them fall down, bleed, and get carried away in a stretcher -- not so funny. He's throwing rocks for the same reason most chimps throw feces -- not because he is trying to injure a spectator, but because it amuses him to see their reaction!
    • by xwizbt (513040) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:03PM (#27157113) Homepage

      Clearly not intelligent enough - to really assert his intelligence he ought to be constructing small enclosures for other animals to keep for his own amusement.

      Only intelligent animals keep other animals in cages.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by jlehtira (655619)

        Only intelligent animals keep other animals in cages.

        Herding Aphids: How 'Farmer' Ants Keep Control Of Their Food [sciencedaily.com]: ants have been known to bite the wings off the aphids in order to stop them from getting away and depriving the ants of one of their staple foods: the sugar-rich sticky honeydew which is excreted by aphids when they eat plants.

    • by CaptainPatent (1087643) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:06PM (#27157145) Journal

      Translation: "I'm an intelligent primate who doesn't like being caged up for your amusement."

      They must be even more prepared than we originally suspected...

      They've hired a translator!

  • Jane Goodal (Score:4, Funny)

    by IAR80 (598046) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @04:46PM (#27156835) Homepage
    Bring me that Jane Goodall chick!
  • by Coraon (1080675) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @04:47PM (#27156849)
    welcome our well perpaired monkey overloards...
  • by Sponge Bath (413667) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @04:48PM (#27156863)

    Rocks or feces...hmmmm.
    Maybe I'll just stick with chairs.

  • by thegnu (557446) <thegnu@g[ ]l.com ['mai' in gap]> on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @04:49PM (#27156887) Journal

    I'm always surprised when science finds out about something I already knew. Now, I know I probably know things that actually aren't true, but sometimes it's downright shocking that people didn't know something. :/

  • > "...researchers observe Chimp drinking water in preparation to spit on humans lurking just outside cage."

    C'mon - anyone visiting a zoo has had opportunity to observe such behavior...how is a monkey's ammo bunker such a surprise.

  • Although I have no basis for this observation, this new, violent behavior is clearly a result of exposure to violent video games. I'm proposing a measure to restrict the same of video games to primates. Won't someone please think about our zoo-faring children?
  • by Ostracus (1354233) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @04:55PM (#27156969) Journal

    "For a while, zoo keepers tried locking Santino up in the morning so he couldn't collect ammunition for his assaults, but he remained aggressive. They ultimately decided to castrate him in the autumn last year, but will have to wait until the summer to see if that helps."

    Guns don't kill people...uh oh!

    "It is normal behavior for alpha males to want to influence their surroundings ... It is extremely frustrating for him that there are people out of his reach who are pointing at him and laughing," Osvath said. "It cannot be good to be so furious all the time."

    Now we know why review sites get sued.

    • by Locke2005 (849178)
      "It is extremely frustrating for him that there are people out of his reach who are pointing at him and laughing," Osvath said. "It cannot be good to be so furious all the time."
      Why is it that I know exactly how he feels?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Okaaay, first I laughted at the post: WTF, an ape alpha male is upset when he can not control every bit of his sourrundings! ... Do I really need to say it?

  • by Shivetya (243324) on Wednesday March 11, 2009 @05:01PM (#27157067) Homepage Journal

    A good friend who past away a few years ago introduced me to some long time friends of his who own many chimps. One thing I was told flat out was, don't get near the cages. They are very good at trying to tempt people closer and never for any good. They will fondle themselves in front of you, throw stuff at you, and even be very violent should it be their wish. The problem is they are very very good at hiding the signs when it serves them. All of their chimps had their incisors (fang teeth) removed. For while they are very cute when young they would shame any unruly teenager when they are of age.

    While I got a handshake and even a hug from one of the better behaved I was told that in no uncertain terms he was putting on a show to please them. Alone it would be a whole different story.

  • the 31-year-old alpha male

          Not anymore - according to TFA he was castrated last year...

  • MI (Score:2, Funny)

    by Tgeigs (1497313)
    "That's the second biggest monkey I've ever seen" I would have been more impressed if he declared "my name is Mr. Fossey" and challenged the visitors to insult sword fighting...
  • should throw some rocks back, and teach the little bastard a lesson.
  • No wonder he was sullen and attacking people - do you have any idea how cold it is in Sweden this time of year? Particularly for an animal used to living in equatorial Africa!
  • by G3ckoG33k (647276) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @02:48AM (#27163033)

    This is not news. Baboons do this too.

    From: http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=482576 [google.com]

    The Austin Chronicle
    http://www.austinchronicle.com/issues/dispatch/2001-07-27/cols_smartypants.html [austinchronicle.com]

    "Stone-throwing baboons in Saudi Arabia waited three days on the side
    of a mountain road to take revenge on a driver who had killed one of
    their group.

    Al-Riyadh reported on Saturday that the primates laid in wait and
    ambushed the driver on the same mountain road in southwest Saudi
    Arabia from Mecca to Taif where the baboon had been run down earlier
    in the week.

    After spotting the car responsible for the death, one of the apes
    screamed out a signal to the rest to attack, provoking the frenzied
    stone throwing. Although the driver was able to escape, the apes broke
    out the windshield of his car.

    At least 350,000 baboons live in the Gulf state."

    LUSENET: STONE-THROWING BABOONS TAKE REVENGE ON DRIVER
    http://www.greenspun.com/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg.tcl?msg_id=004CxB [greenspun.com]

    "In Saudi Arabia, a man learned a lesson in baboon gang warfare.
    Apparently, earlier in the week the man was driving through a
    mountainous road where he ran over a baboon. Thinking nothing of it,
    the driver got back in his car and resumed his life... Finally, the
    grieving baboons implemented their revenge. They lay hiding on the
    side of the exact mountainous road where their beloved pal had been
    killed and waited for the driver. When the car was spotted, one of the
    baboons screamed out a signal and the others began to bombard the car
    with rocks and stones. The driver escaped, sporting newly soiled
    underwear and a broken windshield."

    Tablet Newspaper: Monkey Love
    http://www.tabletnewspaper.com/vol2iss_21/features/monkeylove.htm [tabletnewspaper.com]

    "Stone-throwing baboons waited three days for revenge on the side of a
    mountain road in Saudi Arabia to take revenge on a motorist who had
    killed one of their group. After finally spotting the car responsible
    for the death, one of the apes screamed out a signal for the rest to
    attack, provoking a frenzied bout of stone throwing. The baboons then
    ripped out the windscreen of the car. The driver managed to escape the
    attack, which took place on the same stretch of road, between Mecca
    and Taif, where the baboon had been run down."

    Ananova: Revenge attack by stone-throwing baboons
    http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/academic/class/16741-s05/www/baboons09122000.pdf [cmu.edu]

    "Stone-throwing baboons in Saudi Arabia waited three days on the side
    of a mountain road to take revenge on a driver who had killed one of
    their group. Al-Riyadh reported on Saturday that the primates laid in
    wait and ambushed the driver on the same mountain road in southwest
    Saudi Arabia from Mecca to Taif where the baboon had been run down
    earlier in the week. After spotting the car responsible for the death,
    one of the apes screamed out a signal to the rest to attack, provoking
    the frenzied stone throwing. Although the driver was able to escape,
    the apes broke out the windshield of his car. At least 350,000 baboons
    live in the Gulf state. Who says animals have no emotions? If you can
    plot revenge, you must be able to feel anger."

    The Jekyl Archives
    http://www.jekyl.com/jekyl/arc_2000.htm [jekyl.com]

    "Saudi Arabia is particularly baboon prone these days, with tales of
    baboons raiding farms, houses, and even schools. But probably the
    strangest report was where a troop deliberately wait in ambush.
    According to newspaper accounts,

  • by fataugie (89032) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @11:32AM (#27167655) Homepage

    We get that Shakespeare play from Bobo the chimp?
    Maybe the keepers should leave a typewriter in there with him and see what develops.

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