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Chandrayaan Maps Apollo Missions

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  • by Jeff DeMaagd (2015) on Sunday January 11, 2009 @03:24PM (#26408811) Homepage Journal

    They will simply say that NASA and the Indian space agency are in cahoots and they will dismiss it.

    That's the way it works.

    The basic thought pattern also suggests that they believe the Soviets and the US were in cahoots too, either that or they haven't thought the objections through. Maybe they don't say it outright, but that's the logical conclusion of their arguments because if the Soviets had any reason to believe it was all faked, they could have said so very loudly, and I don't recall stumbling across anything like that.

  • Six? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by AJWM (19027) on Sunday January 11, 2009 @03:29PM (#26408865) Homepage

    "Chandrayaan has mapped 6 Apollo landing sites on the Moon (Apollo 11, 12, 14 15 and 17)"

    I count that as five. So the Apollo 16 landing (only) was faked?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 11, 2009 @07:34PM (#26411021)

    you know there ARE real conspiracies. here's a great example [chomsky.info]:

    The Fate of an Honest Intellectual
    Noam Chomsky

    [Excerpted from Understanding Power, The New Press, 2002, pp. 244-248]

    I'll tell you another, last case-and there are many others like this. Here's a story which is really tragic. How many of you know about Joan Peters, the book by Joan Peters? There was this best-seller a few years ago [in 1984], it went through about ten printings, by a woman named Joan Peters-or at least, signed by Joan Peters-called From Time Immemorial. It was a big scholarly-looking book with lots of footnotes, which purported to show that the Palestinians were all recent immigrants [i.e. to the Jewish-settled areas of the former Palestine, during the British mandate years of 1920 to 1948]. And it was very popular-it got literally hundreds of rave reviews, and no negative reviews: the Washington Post, the New York Times, everybody was just raving about it. Here was this book which proved that there were really no Palestinians! Of course, the implicit message was, if Israel kicks them all out there's no moral issue, because they're just recent immigrants who came in because the Jews had built up the country. And there was all kinds of demographic analysis in it, and a big professor of demography at the University of Chicago [Philip M. Hauser] authenticated it. That was the big intellectual hit for that year: Saul Bellow, Barbara Tuchman, everybody was talking about it as the greatest thing since chocolate cake.Well, one graduate student at Princeton, a guy named Norman Finkelstein, started reading through the book. He was interested in the history of Zionism, and as he read the book he was kind of surprised by some of the things it said. He's a very careful student, and he started checking the references-and it turned out that the whole thing was a hoax, it was completely faked: probably it had been put together by some intelligence agency or something like that. Well, Finkelstein wrote up a short paper of just preliminary findings, it was about twenty-five pages or so, and he sent it around to I think thirty people who were interested in the topic, scholars in the field and so on, saying: "Here's what I've found in this book, do you think it's worth pursuing?"
    Well, he got back one answer, from me. I told him, yeah, I think it's an interesting topic, but I warned him, if you follow this, you're going to get in trouble-because you're going to expose the American intellectual community as a gang of frauds, and they are not going to like it, and they're going to destroy you. So I said: if you want to do it, go ahead, but be aware of what you're getting into. It's an important issue, it makes a big difference whether you eliminate the moral basis for driving out a population-it's preparing the basis for some real horrors-so a lot of people's lives could be at stake. But your life is at stake too, I told him, because if you pursue this, your career is going to be ruined.
    Well, he didn't believe me. We became very close friends after this, I didn't know him before. He went ahead and wrote up an article, and he started submitting it to journals. Nothing: they didn't even bother responding. I finally managed to place a piece of it in In These Times, a tiny left-wing journal published in Illinois, where some of you may have seen it. Otherwise nothing, no response. Meanwhile his professors-this is Princeton University, supposed to be a serious place-stopped talking to him: they wouldn't make appointments with him, they wouldn't read his papers, he basically had to quit the program.
    By this time, he was getting kind of desperate, and he asked me what to do. I gave him what I thought was good advice, but what turned out to be bad advice: I suggested that he shift over to a different department, where I knew some people and figured he'd at least be treated decently. That turned out to be wrong. He switched over, and when he got to the point of writing

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