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Dubai Is Building a Refrigerated Beach 249

Posted by samzenpus
from the building-ice-castles dept.
dataxtream writes "The world's first refrigerated beach is to be built at a luxury hotel in Dubai, located along the southern coast of the Persian Gulf. The beach will include heat-absorbing pipes under the sand along with large wind blowers, which will keep tourists cool and guard their feet against the hot sand. Half of me says these guys need a reality check, the other half wants to go there." I believe I've just thought of a way we could solve this whole global warming thing I've been hearing about.

*

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Dubai Is Building a Refrigerated Beach

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  • by trybywrench (584843) on Friday December 19, 2008 @05:58PM (#26178859)
    I lived in Daytona until i was 12 and remember the beach landscape constantly changing. Wouldn't they have to keep moving the pipes? Like bury them deeper at times and shallower at others based on what the beach is doing that day.
    • by RajivSLK (398494) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:08PM (#26178989)

      Well, I'd guess that this is a man made beach with strict engineering and erosion control.

      Also, I've lived in Victoria BC Canada for most of my life and our beaches barely change at all. So all beaches are not like Daytona.

    • by Brigadier (12956) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:10PM (#26179019)

      much of the beaches in Dubai are artificial. More in the sense that they have dredgers which constantly infuse new sand on the beaches to stop beach erosion. My main concern with Dubai desire to be the playground of the rich and famous is what they plan to do when terrorist realize there are infidels partying in their neck of the woods.

      I've never heard Dubai speak of how they plan to handle potential hostility from extremists. It wont be long before what happened in India finds its way to Dubai

      • by eln (21727) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:27PM (#26179169) Homepage

        Given that there are more foreign workers in Dubai than there are citizens, and that most of those foreign workers get by on little better than slave wages and with few rights, I'm amazed something nasty hasn't happened already.

        Dubai is building their playground for the rich on the backs of exploited foreign laborers. That sort of arrangement is rarely successful over the long term. Eventually the scattered civil unrest gets larger and more organized, and then the real trouble starts.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          Apart from the data-charges (which are *lethal*), the office that I have in Dubai is more highly paid for the 8 people there than the 16 (including a CEO) in the Australian office.

          Just a note, didn't really have anything to say but thought the "slave wages" was a bit of a stretch. At least for my set of foreign workers.
          • by Anonymous Coward on Friday December 19, 2008 @07:39PM (#26179847)

            He's not talking about white collar professionals...he's talking about people from the Indian subcontinent and other poor regions that are used for manual labor (e.g. construction). I lived in the region for almost a decade, and it was shameful to see the way those people were treated, as if they were subhuman. Granted they make more than they would in their home country, but their quality of life is so low, especially in contrast with the insane amount of wealth and waste there. Even worse than their standard of living was the way they were treated by the indigenous Arab people. To give you a better context, if you've seen the movie "Syriana", the way migrant workers are treated is extremely realistic.

          • by batkiwi (137781)

            Is this an office doing construction? Because he said it's being BUILT on slave labour.

            Your co-workers are the ones the GP is referring to who are taking advantage of the things built by said labour.

          • by zippthorne (748122) on Friday December 19, 2008 @08:00PM (#26179999) Journal

            What do the people in your office do? Are they out there building and maintaining the wonders of Dubai's skyline? Working the dredgers that build up the artificial islands? Serving the meals, cleaning the sheets, polishing the brass, driving the trucks?

            Yeah. Of course the office workers aren't getting the slave wages. They're the rich people the slaves are building Dubai for.

            Jeez man, think a little. Just because you need a job doesn't mean you're poor.

        • People in that part of the world have put up with "inhuman abuse" for thousands of years - it's a different mindset from "the west."
          • by timeOday (582209)

            People in that part of the world have put up with "inhuman abuse" for thousands of years - it's a different mindset from "the west."

            Is it? The Old Testament is pretty clear that the Jews didn't much care for servitude. The history of constant unrest in that part of the world for the last N-thousand years says a lot too. And before you attribute all that to purely theological differences rather than materialism, remember that one of the principal hopes in the great messiah was to free the chosen people

      • by gujo-odori (473191) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:29PM (#26179181)

        No, I don't expect you would hear them speak about it. Better to have it just be a surprise to the bad guys, but I'd be very surprised if there isn't a plan. Also, in a small country like Dubai, it's easy to both know and control who goes in and out, and how they do so. Additionally, I expect that in Dubai, their laws probably give them rather broad authority in that are. Finally, Dubai is at least somewhat less of a target simply by virtue of the fact that it is an Islamic nation. That isn't to say that the terrorists have any qualms about killing other Muslims with whom they disagree - they most certainly have none - but it would make them look bad to attack an Islamic nation, and while they care not a whit for human lives, they do care about image and PR. Marketing, in fact, is probably the thing they are better at than anything else.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        The UAE doesn't have to deal with pesky problems such as "human rights". They can just post armed guard and snipers all around with orders to shoot first and ask questions later, if it really comes to that. And sink all unidentified approaching boats on sight.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Grishnakh (216268)

          The terrorists in Mumbai arrived in an identified boat. They hijacked a fishing vessel, killed the crew, and kept the captain alive long enough to come into port safely without arousing suspicion. Unless UAE intends to station troops on all fishing boats that leave its ports, it would also be vulnerable to such an attack. Of course, they really don't have to worry, since the "religion of peace" followers wouldn't dare attack an Islamic country, as that would be bad PR.

          • Of course, they really don't have to worry, since the "religion of peace" followers wouldn't dare attack an Islamic country, as that would be bad PR.

            Islam has a lot of internal strife. Osama sleeps and dreams of attacking Saudi Arabia - certainly an Islamic country.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        Your correct. Remember that palm shaped islands call Palms Island, shouldn't all things be that way, and they just spray sand dredged from the bottom of the Persian gulf and lay the palm pattern.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palm_Islands [wikipedia.org]
        I assume they will use breakwaters like this for the hotel but further away to make it more "aesthetic".
        I don't know about how they will handle the extremist but I know how they handle the tourist already:
        http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/meast/10/16/dubai.sex.couple.prison/index [cnn.com]

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by flyonthewall (584734)

        Lots of bad guys in the UAE and more specifically in Dubai. Lots of good guys too. However the area (both Dubai and Abu Dabi) is a financial centre for the bad guys. They will not do anything to jeopardize that as they know the instant they raise trouble they will lose that privilege.

        So, in the end everyone is looking at each other in the white of the eyes, restraining themselves (and just collecting Int).

        Actually quite safe for a middle eastern country as long as you do not try to stick out like a sore th

      • Dubai is small enough that security can be handled like it is in places like MonteCarlo - quietly, discretely, and very very effectively.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Well, yes and no. I grew on an island off of the coast of North Carolina which was basically one giant beach that has to deal with erosion of not only it's beaches but the entire island. Their response to it was to replace the beach.

      I am not an environmental engineer, but I do recall that they would dredge for sand that had naturally eroded off and pump it back onto the beach. They could just put the pipes down and pump the eroded sand back onto the beach every so often.

      Now I'm sure it's not cheap, but Duba

    • The beach in MonteCarlo is completely imported gravel, very comfy to lay on, and the particles are not small enough to shift. I imagine this beach will be in a "cove" which is not subject to the longshore currents and rearranging that many natural beaches (like Daytona) are.
  • Idle this shit (Score:2, Insightful)

    by mathx314 (1365325)
    I'm not normally the one to complain about this, but seriously, it's getting ridiculous. I have no problem with Idle being its own separate entity that I can ignore or follow as I choose, but I do have a problem with Idle stories leaking into Main. A story about a refrigerated beach with an Idle-style picture and a stupid joke at the end is not News for Nerds or Stuff that Matters.
    • Re:Idle this shit (Score:5, Insightful)

      by SydShamino (547793) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:12PM (#26179031)

      Are you implying that this audience isn't interested in domes cities and artificial living environments??

      Read some science fiction man! I grew up on this stuff.

      • by pipingguy (566974) *
        Are you implying that this audience isn't interested in domes cities and artificial living environments??

        Starlost: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0069638/ [imdb.com]

        "Writer Harlan Ellison, unhappy with changes made to his concept for the show, had his credit changed to the pseudonym "Cordwainer Bird.""
    • Re:Idle this shit (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Brigadier (12956) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:13PM (#26179039)

      not all nerds collect hard drive platters for a living .... I have an architectural background and think it quite interesting when fringe type ideas make it unto slashdot. Nerd =! Computers there are many other types of Tech out there besides C++

      • by pipingguy (566974) *
        I have an architectural background

        So how's BIM implementation going so far? Architects seem to hate it (whatever "it" is). In the process plant world, 3D is going fairly well, but that discipline tends to be more data-centric and complicated than architecture. Architecture is more art than engineering so it's less interested in selling it's soul to the infernal machine.
    • by owlstead (636356)

      I'm sorry, but if this is true, this is definitely something to get aroused over. How can we expect any leading entity to take global warming and the (upcoming, in 30 years time) oil crises a priority unless we make it one. These idiots are ruining the world on their friggin' Alice in Wonderland trip. And it is not over there. In the Netherlands, there was this idea to put down a skating round *outside*. I don't know how much electricity would go into that but it must be horrible.

      How can you expect a third

  • by tetromino (807969) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:07PM (#26178981)

    I believe I've just thought of a way we could solve this whole global warming thing I've been hearing about.

    You mean, power the giant beach refrigerator by attaching a generator to the spinning corpse of old Sadi Carnot [wikipedia.org]?

  • by glavenoid (636808) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:10PM (#26179017) Journal
    No booze on the beach. Pass. No half-nekkid chicks. Pass. I'll save my beach-going for a land that loves sin...
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Yeah, but if Dubai keeps building cool shit like this, it won't be long until we get a new Dubai-themed Vegas hotel with miniature versions of everything they dream up in the actual Dubai. I'm sure making people feel like oil sheiks would also work as a "math-challenged people come give us your money" theme as well.

      So this is less an advertisement for you than it is a preview of what you can expect to see in the places you're more interested in.

  • Why bother going? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by photonic (584757) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:14PM (#26179049)

    Half of me says these guys need a reality check, the other half wants to go there.

    Why bother going to Dubai anyhow? It is too hot, they only have sand and some fake islands [theemiratesnetwork.com] that no-one wants to buy and no culture (unless you are into modern, megalomaniac architecture). And in terms of population, there are just overwhelmingly rich locals, western expats designing toy projects for said locals and Indian immigrants actually building those toy projects. If you are choosing a holiday destination, I could not thing of anything less interesting.

    • Re:Why bother going? (Score:5, Informative)

      by istartedi (132515) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:34PM (#26179203) Journal

      shhhh. You'll pop their bubble. Ooops. Too late [bloomberg.com].

      • by AbRASiON (589899) *

        For all 'intensive' purposes? Was this a joke and I missed it? Should I be laughing with you or at you?

    • by Rycross (836649)

      Agreed. Without an interesting local culture to go along with it, playing on the beach tends to turn into a snooze-fest real fast. I prefer visiting areas with rich history.

      • by Grishnakh (216268)

        You may prefer that, but many people just want to sit on the beach for their vacation. Of course, the problem there is that beaches aren't exactly a rare commodity. Here in the USA, only an idiot would go to Dubai for the beaches, since we have plenty of our own, plus lots of nice Caribbean islands nearby to visit. In Europe, there's plenty of beaches in Spain, France, Italy, etc.

        Honestly, I don't know who, other than Arabs from neighboring countries, would go to Dubai for the beaches. I think it's just

    • by nbert (785663)
      I totally agree. Thinking of it a city on the south pole could offer just as much attraction as Dubai (provided with the same wealth). Luxury hotels are all the same around the globe, so why stay in one which is located in a city which features an uncomfortable environment and very few non-artificial points of interest.

      I could be wrong in believing that the hype around Dubai will vanish in the near future. Las Vegas for example is still doing well ;)

      It is understandable that the Emirate of Dubai wants t
      • They might be better off doing what the Maldives wants to and just buying a new place to live when the oil runs out. With the amount of money they have, they stand a better chance.

        The climate there is horrible. The location is excellent for transport, but other than that there is nothing to stay for once the oil runs out.

    • Half of me says these guys need a reality check, the other half wants to go there.

      Why bother going to Dubai anyhow? It is too hot, they only have sand and some fake islands

      Plus, they have a really bad attitude about the most fun thing to do on a beach in the middle of the night. [telegraph.co.uk]

    • by fermion (181285)
      Who in their right mind would go to this right wing country full of religious fundamentalist, well other than like minded religious fundamentalists that are scare of alcohol and the opposite sex.

      In the past year they have arrested tourist for having a bit of cannabis on the shoe. They apparently also reserve the right to arrest people for carrying poppy seeds.. You can also apparently get four years for codeine, and other drugs one might have for urgent a valid medical needs.

      And lets not forget what h

    • Indoor skiing!!! yeah, it is a pretty drab sounding place, unless you're out to marry a princess.
    • by bhiestand (157373) *

      Half of me says these guys need a reality check, the other half wants to go there.

      Why bother going to Dubai anyhow? It is too hot, they only have sand and some fake islands [theemiratesnetwork.com] that no-one wants to buy and no culture (unless you are into modern, megalomaniac architecture).

      And refrigerated beaches...

  • And if they could make it levitate that would be awesome. I hope they spend their next 100 billion dollars on that one.

  • ...to relax after a hard day on the ski slopes:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/in_pictures/4491210.stm [bbc.co.uk]

    http://www.skidubai.com/ [skidubai.com]

  • Am I the only one that thinks mixing sand with giant blowers may be a bad idea?
  • by maxfresh (1435479) on Friday December 19, 2008 @06:44PM (#26179295)
    What they are proposing is just to extract the solar thermal energy from the beach sand. The solar energy doesn't have to be wasted. If they were to take the solar heat laden coolant, and pass it through a heat exchanger, and into a Stirling engine, they could use it to generate electricity to power desalination equipment, for example. Using the cooler ocean water as the heat sink wouldn't produce very high efficiency, but it would still be a net gain. It wouldn't cost very much more than just throwing the heat away. They could get coolor sand, and generate solar power at the same time. Just a thought...
    • by 4D6963 (933028)
      Which would merely marginally reduce the costs... For some reason I have a feeling that these guys can afford their current plan as it is.
    • by Kagura (843695)

      If they were to take the solar heat laden coolant, and pass it through a heat exchanger, and into a Stirling engine, they could use it to generate electricity to power desalination equipment

      Are you suggesting that coolants migrate?

    • If the ocean water is cooler and available, it would be more efficient to just circulate it under the sand... I suspect they're using (electric powered) heat pumps at some point in the process. Oil effectively costs them less than drinkable water there, so energy efficiency is a laughable concept in their economy.
  • Weebl & Bob [weebls-stuff.com]

  • Stupid, stupid (Score:2, Insightful)

    by dasunst3r (947970)

    This idea is as stupid as the indoor skiing slope. Not only is it a waste of energy, but it will NEVER capture the true feeling of being on a beach, especially if you forget your sandals. I hope the footwear industry lobbies long and hard to block the refrigeration of beaches -- there's some revenue to be had in those overpriced sandals one could buy near the beach.

    • by Kagura (843695)
      For what it's worth, I hate walking on fucking hot sand. It hurts.
      • For what it's worth, I hate walking on fucking hot sand. It hurts.

        You should try one of the many white sand beaches of Cuba. They naturally don't get hot from the Sun.

        As a bonus, vacations there are quite cheap, and the aged rum is so smooth, it's like drinking cognac.

        The resorts' food is pretty average, though, but everything else makes up for it.

        (Disclaimer: Maybe there's other such white sand beaches in the Caribbean, but Cuba's are the only ones I've visited)

        • by rts008 (812749)

          Having never been to Cuba, I will take your word for the Cuban Experience; it is similar enough to my visit to Puerto Rico [wikipedia.org], that you could substitute Puerto Rico for Cuba in your post, and it would be real close (except the mediocre food!) to my experience!.

          I thoroughly enjoyed the Caribbean, and hope to revisit soon.

          Thanks for the 'heads up' about Cuba, I may try that next. (Besides, I really enjoy a good cigar with either good brandy, or that marvelous, smooth, and tasty aged rum!)

          My visit to Puerto Rico

    • ... else these wouldn't be ideas...

      They'd benefit atleast a minority of the population .. a waste of money and environmental space? definitely!

      It sure gives an entire different definition of a living-in-the-dome experience, for tourists.. maybe?

  • Easier solution (Score:4, Insightful)

    by OrangeTide (124937) on Friday December 19, 2008 @07:34PM (#26179801) Homepage Journal

    Go to Bermuda for your next vacation, a place where the sand isn't scorching hot.

    It's about location, location, location. And Dubai isn't the location.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by tripmine (1160123)
      But that's why these guys keep building cool stuff like this all the time. If it isn't the location, they'll MAKE IT be the location. Remember, before Disney World, south Orlando was literally a swamp.
  • Awesome (Score:5, Funny)

    by InlawBiker (1124825) on Friday December 19, 2008 @08:22PM (#26180189)

    Somebody needed to deflect attention from America's excesses and take the spotlight for needless waste and overspending. Go Dubai!

  • Fuck, time to start stealing gasoline again...

  • Indoor ski slope... Refrigerated beach... "I'm crazy Dubai -- I'm gonna build me a ZERO GRAVITY WATERPARK! Woo! I'm crazy!"
  • I live in Dubai. I read one of the local newspapers here this morning just before I checked Slashdot, and it turns out the air-conditioned beach has been put on hold [thenational.ae] until they find a way to make it more "environmentally friendly".

We don't know who it was that discovered water, but we're pretty sure that it wasn't a fish. -- Marshall McLuhan

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