Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Space Science

Dark Matter Discovered Near Solar System? 179

Posted by Soulskill
from the near-being-a-relative-term dept.
gpronger writes "The ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) has potentially discovered the presence of dark matter close (only 3000 light-years) to our solar system. The system detected a large-amount of high energy cosmic rays which match the theoretical signature of dark matter annihilating itself. The universe is believed to be composed of about 25% dark matter, but there has been little evidence of it. This discovery, if correct, would be the first." The paper was published in Nature , but it requires a subscription to see beyond the abstract.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Dark Matter Discovered Near Solar System?

Comments Filter:
  • by fred fleenblat (463628) on Friday November 21, 2008 @09:24PM (#25854157) Homepage

    where is the dark antimatter?

  • by techno-vampire (666512) on Friday November 21, 2008 @09:31PM (#25854215) Homepage
    Compared to intergalactic space, 3,000 light years is practically next door. It's all relative, and when it comes to astronomy, anything inside the Milky Way is considered close.
  • by east coast (590680) on Friday November 21, 2008 @09:34PM (#25854245)
    The universe is believed to be composed of about 25% dark matter, but there has been little evidence of it. This discovery, if correct, would be the first.

    If this would be the first evidence how can we already have a little evidence of it?
  • by s.bots (1099921) on Friday November 21, 2008 @10:18PM (#25854551)

    Unless and until physicists can fully explain the true mechanism of movement in language that the layperson can understand, I'll remain highly skeptical of their more outlandish conclusions (black holes, wormholes, dark matter, dark energy, big bang, parallel universes, etc.), sorry.

    How do you expect the explanations in layman's terms to be any different than what we use now (what goes up must come down, at equilibrium every action has an equal and opposite reaction, object at rest stays at rest until acted upon, etc. etc. etc.)? These are extremely complex phenomena that, if described in layman's terms, cannot be accurately portrayed.

  • by American Scum (1126015) on Friday November 21, 2008 @10:47PM (#25854745)

    I still believe that 'dark matter' is only a temporary constant inserted into an equation modern scientists don't truly understand.

    In time they will discover what is causing the effects of this 'dark matter' - it will not be super strange matter, nor another form of matter, but will be either a change in the overall calculations of our universe's energy or it will be some type of substance that was not accounted for.

    Theorists throw in some offbeat number to the calculation every 30 years or so to account for what they just can't figure out.

  • Re:math hosers. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by CTachyon (412849) <chronos&chronos-tachyon,net> on Saturday November 22, 2008 @01:43AM (#25855677) Homepage

    Dude, seriously, read up on electroweak theory. You're so 1960's.

  • Re:close ? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by gpronger (1142181) on Saturday November 22, 2008 @07:03PM (#25860581) Journal
    I was sitting in my office (Chicago) and the phone rang; two vendor reps wanted to drop by, being in the area, but needed some directions. As it happens they were in Peoria (central Illinois) which struck me as peculiar in saying that they were in the area. When they made it in, it turned out they were "in" from Australia. So in fact, from there perspective, they were "in the area".Seems things are all relative.

    All things are relative, all relatives are things, my relatives took all my things.

    Greg

It is much easier to suggest solutions when you know nothing about the problem.

Working...