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Space Science

India's Chandrayaan Lands Impact Probe On the Moon 203

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the peacock-has-landed dept.
yaksha writes to tell us that the Indian Space probe, Chandrayaan, has become only the fourth nation to land a probe on the Moon. The 35-kg Moon Impact Probe touched down in what officials are describing as a "perfect operation." "Developed by ISRO's Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre of Thiruvananthapuram, the primary objective of MIP is to demonstrate the technologies required for landing a probe at the desired location on the moon. The probe will help qualify some of the technologies related to future soft landing missions. This apart, scientific exploration of the moon at close distance is also intended using MIP."
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India's Chandrayaan Lands Impact Probe On the Moon

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  • Pround moment (Score:4, Insightful)

    by tejaskokje (828874) on Friday November 14, 2008 @03:18PM (#25763937) Homepage
    Wonderful day. Proud to be an Indian.
  • Re:Irrational Fear (Score:5, Insightful)

    by colmore (56499) on Friday November 14, 2008 @03:25PM (#25764031) Journal

    Yes, if there's another successful nation on the planet, we're dooooooomed.

    Talk about insecure.

  • Re:Which is it? (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday November 14, 2008 @03:28PM (#25764095)

    It is MIP - Moon Impact Probe. The summary is bad. But that's no excuse not to read the linked story.

  • by denttford (579202) * on Friday November 14, 2008 @03:40PM (#25764249) Homepage
    The probe is not a nation, nor is the EU.

    Instead: "With the Chandrayaan-1 mission, the ISRO becomes the fourth space program..."
  • by owlnation (858981) on Friday November 14, 2008 @03:42PM (#25764285)
    This should come as no surprise. Just as it should have been no surprise when the British Empire fell either.

    It's very hard to understand why Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" is not required reading for politicians and corporate leaders. If you depend on slave labor (in the US case, outsourcing) then ultimately your empire will fall. It's inevitable. And yet so avoidable. Eventually, there is a payback for greed, and this's just yet more proof that politicians are ultimately self-centered morons.
  • Re:Pround moment (Score:5, Insightful)

    by CarpetShark (865376) on Friday November 14, 2008 @04:06PM (#25764573)

    Considering that this advances humanity (albeit just a little more, since we've done similar things before, but rarely), I think all of humanity can be proud of this.

  • by argiedot (1035754) on Friday November 14, 2008 @04:07PM (#25764587) Homepage
    You know, I'm going to tell you something. It may seem like the sensible option would be to take the space money and put it elsewhere, but that isn't true.

    India's INSAT series have been very helpful in the past, and people were saying this when those were launched. ISRO has a nice commercial launch program and this will only improve perceptions of their ability and reliability.

    That's all without pointing out the implicit false dichotomy in your comment. India can solve its problems, we, as a people, in incredible short sightedness, have chosen not to. Corruption is rampant, but the only people who can stand strong against it (the informed, educated middle class) is happy because they have good salaries. The poor cannot do anything, they have little power. The rich won't do anything, they benefit. We're in that lovely no-man's land where it is better for the individual to take what he's got and live it nicely. I don't mean this as a condemnation of any political philosophy, or India itself. I am Indian, and I am like this, and I can see that everyone else is, too.
  • Re:Pround moment (Score:3, Insightful)

    by catbertscousin (770186) on Friday November 14, 2008 @04:24PM (#25764803)
    Congratulations! The more countries that study space, the better. The final frontier shouldn't be an elitists club; anyone with the dedication to develop and support a space program should be proud.
  • Re:Irrational Fear (Score:5, Insightful)

    by osu-neko (2604) on Friday November 14, 2008 @04:25PM (#25764825)

    Unfortunately, you're not the only one. A lot of people are deluded in precisely the same way. There's a old human instinct that gets misapplied in modern times such that when someone in Florida is successful, someone in Michigan gets excited about it, proud of the accomplishment and hopeful for his future prospects in the world, whereas if it's someone in Berlin or Baghdad or Beijing, the same person in Michigan gets depressed, takes no pride in it, and worries about his future prospects in the world. This never made a great deal of sense, and makes virtually none at all in the modern world with a global economy.

    We enrich ourselves the most (both monetarily and culturally) through our interactions with those more closely on par with us economically. Our best trading partners are the G8, and we all profit immensely from their success. Our most harmful relationships, both for our own economies and citizens as well as for those we exploit, are with third-world nations. The imbalances in those relationships hurt us all in different ways.

    The moral of this story is quite simple: the sooner India, China, and other third-world nations "get their acts together" and rise to "first-world" status, the sooner they come to be on par with us in the same way our G8 partners are, the richer we all will be. An impoverished and thus cheaply exploitable India is a far greater threat to us than opportunity -- a rich and prosperous India would be a far greater opportunity than threat.

  • by jcnnghm (538570) on Friday November 14, 2008 @04:43PM (#25765075)

    If they land men on the moon in two years, they'll be 41 years behind. You seem to assume we haven't accomplished anything since 1969. You're discounting our Mars missions (rovers, landers, satellites), the Hubble, the Space Station, GPS, the Shuttle, the upcoming JWST, not to mention the myriad satellites, probes and impacters. We've truly, repeatedly, gone where no man has gone before, they cannot say the same. It's much easier to follow in the footsteps of another than to blaze your own trail.

    Granted, we haven't really made any giant leaps since 69, except for ubiquitous Internet (that's a massive except) and minicomputers, but we have made enough small steps to climb a mountain. Everything we did yesterday, we do better today. We haven't done too much new, just everything old, better. So much advancement has been made in the last 15 years, it's ridiculous. It may not be a space age, but it's certainly the age of improvement and refinement. Everything is smaller, faster, smarter, cheaper, and all around better. Many small steps, in aggregate, can be better than one giant leap.

    It's foolish to assume that because people are catching up to our achievements made decades ago, that they are somehow superior to us. It is good for them though, and perhaps it will give us the impetus to move on to bigger and better things.

  • by Brahmastra (685988) on Friday November 14, 2008 @04:53PM (#25765213)
    I was waiting for that - Stop all progress because someone somewhere needs something. Maybe you should stop shitting and flushing because someone in the world needs some water
  • by tinker_taylor (618697) on Friday November 14, 2008 @04:58PM (#25765275) Homepage

    I read a whole bunch of "wisecracks" and trolls about India and stereotypical bigoted comments about 7-11 and call centers, etc.

    It is sad that geeks such as some on Slashdot choose to try and divide and disrespect as opposed to integrate and celebrate what is surely a quantum leap in what technology and engineering has enabled India/mankind to do.

    When technology levels the playing ground, it becomes imperative for those whose hegemony is threatened change from their jingoism to a more mellifluous tune.

  • Congrats (Score:2, Insightful)

    by RJBeery (956252) <rjbeery@gma i l . com> on Friday November 14, 2008 @05:01PM (#25765321)
    As an American I offer you and your country congratulations and welcome to the Moon Club! It is indeed a feat to be proud of.
  • Re:Irrational Fear (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday November 14, 2008 @06:55PM (#25766535)

    The moral of this story is quite simple: the sooner India, China, and other third-world nations "get their acts together" and rise to "first-world" status, the sooner they come to be on par with us in the same way our G8 partners are, the richer we all will be. An impoverished and thus cheaply exploitable India is a far greater threat to us than opportunity -- a rich and prosperous India would be a far greater opportunity than threat.

    That's not entirely true. The comfortable lives people in rich countries enjoy is because they can outsource labor to poorer countries. An iPod costs only $200 because they guy making it in China makes only (say) $200/month. Now if it were manufactured in the US, it would probably cost at least $300.

    This'll have a rippling effect on prices of all commodities. For eg people whose services we depend upon, like cooks and waiters will demand more money, since their money will now buy less. As a result eating out will become more expensive, as will everything else.

    I grew up in India before moving to the US. My comfortable live in India and now in the US was/is possible because people who I depend on directly and indirectly make a lot less than what I do.

  • Re:Irrational Fear (Score:3, Insightful)

    by spazdor (902907) on Friday November 14, 2008 @08:32PM (#25767217)

    Yes, if there's another successful nation on the planet, we're dooooooomed.

    For your sentiment to make sense, you'd have to be confident that America still has what it takes to go to the moon. Is that the case?

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