Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Space Science

Scientists Solve Mystery of Star Formation Near Black Holes 88

Posted by Soulskill
from the just-add-water-and-near-infinite-density dept.
eonlabs writes "A new paper has been published on the formation of stars in close proximity to a supermassive black hole. Their formation has not been well understood until now, but with the help of a year of supercomputer time, scientists have been able to model the interstellar processes needed to produce them. The results not only match up well with earlier observations, but provide clues as to how their formation is remotely possible. It also helps clear up previous research in this area. 'The simulations...followed the evolution of two separate giant gas clouds up to 100,000 times the mass of the Sun, as they fell towards the supermassive black hole. ...The disrupted clouds form into spiral patterns as they orbit the black hole... In these conditions, only high mass stars are able to form and these stars inherit the eccentric orbits from the elliptical disc.'" The paper itself was published in Science, but you'll need a subscription to read more than the abstract.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Scientists Solve Mystery of Star Formation Near Black Holes

Comments Filter:
  • you'll need a subscription to read more than the abstract.

    Slashdot gets worse: now we can't RTFA. Not that that'll make the slightest bit of difference to anyone's comments.

    • by Daimanta (1140543)

      That's ok, nobody reads the article anyway. People on Slashdot think they are right and no article, read or unread, can change this.

      • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        That's ok, nobody reads the article anyway. People on Slashdot think they are right and no article, read or unread, can change this.

        Incorrect. Only myself and those that agree with me are actually right.

    • Chances are, if you can understand the article then you probably work somewhere that has a subscription to access it.
  • Also on the BBC (Score:5, Informative)

    by Firefalcon (7323) on Saturday August 23, 2008 @12:57PM (#24719513) Homepage Journal

    It's also on the BBC News site:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7574255.stm [bbc.co.uk]

  • Confucius say (Score:1, Interesting)

    Confucius say "Bright light near hole remind me of gynecologist."

  • "but you'll need a subscription to read more than the abstract"

    That, AND a super massive brain.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      My brain is super dense. Does that count?

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by QuoteMstr (55051)

      Why? Astrophysics isn't that hard: you just need a good understanding of calculus (differential equations for best results) and humility enough to look up obscure terms. I think anyone of average intelligence could learn enough to get the gist of a research paper, if not to spot errors or produce results himself.

      We really ought to teach calculus as part of the standard curriculum. It'll help demystify science and help everyone.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Adambomb (118938)

        We really ought to teach calculus as part of the standard curriculum. It'll help demystify science and help everyone

        I entirely agree; It has gone on too long now where people hear the word calculus and instantly freeze up thinking "oh i wont be able to do it!". Granted some people might not be geared towards thinking the way you need to think for calculus, but I'm pretty sure its a much smaller segment of the population that fits that description than society thinks. Many people hear of integrals or transforms and simply sieze up without actually finding out if they CAN do such things when they apply themselves.

        I'll neve

        • I'll never really understand that defeatist kind of mentality either. It seems to be the same pattern in peoples heads that causes issues with tech support. How many times have you had to explain to someone something that was written out exactly in the error message they received as they didn't read it at all because "I'm not good with computers!"?

          To be fair, this is mostly a fault of software programmers: 99% of the error messages are gibberish nonsense, so the best strategy for a common user is to simply

          • by drinkypoo (153816)

            With respect to maths, my experience is that the defeatist attitude is caused by woeful teachers.

            I never even got through pre-algebra because I couldn't understand my instructor (well, maybe one word in five) and had a class of about 40 people. Oddly they tried to place me in second-year Algebra when I went back to college and finally scratched up a worthless degree, so obviously I can use a little bit of it.

            There's also the fact that we teach to maybe two types of learning out of a dozen to forty different ways (depending on who you believe.)

            • I had a lousy teacher for Trig and Algebra. It is not an exaggeration to say that this guy screwed up many classes of kids in his time there. I later heard that he had suffered a series of small strokes as he got older, and should have retired or gone on disability, but he was within a few year of retirement. Rather than show the guy the door early with only a partial pension, they let the guy continue to teach until full retirement, during which time he continued to worsen. Kids who were brilliant A st
          • by Gazzonyx (982402)
            From the other perspective, though, how are you supposed to describe an error in twenty words or less? People at work ask me a question, and I can see them lose interest before I've gotten more than five words out. They don't understand the problem, and they don't care - they just want it fixed, even if they can't tell you what it is that's broken.

            I hear "are you doing something with the 'system'? It's really slow" a few times a week, where the system could be: the internet, email server(s) (they refus
            • how are you supposed to describe an error in twenty words or less?

              A good error message isn't supposed to describe the error, it's supposed to describe the solution. The right answer is to give instructions as of what the user can do to fix the problem (that includes calling the expert if the solution is out of reach to the user knowledge).

              You not having a clue about the right course of action is proof that developers shouldn't be involved in anything in relation with user interaction, be it error reporting,

              • by Gazzonyx (982402)

                [...] Yes, I know programmers love doing all that, but it's a mistake. The design should be left to someone with at least some basic training in psychology and/or ergonomics

                Actually, I know that I have no talent for it, and would rather avoid it at all costs... but that doesn't convince the powers that be (or the users themselves) to keep me away from the front ends.

        • Calculus IS part of the standard curriculum in most districts.
      • A person of average intelligence simply can't learn calculus. I'm considered above average, but it took me two tries to pass Calculus I, a C- in Calc II, and finally a horrendously low F in differential equations pressed me to give up. (Throw in an F in physics, and three consecutive flunkings of data structures, and that's why I ended up a philosophy major... where I got near-perfect grades.)
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        I am of greater than average intelligence and the "calculus" you speak of is completely incomprehensible to me. You must really think highly of yourself if you think that just because you're good at something everyone else must be good a it or they aren't of even "average intelligence."

        Mod me a troll if you want, but you know I'm right.

        • by PitaBred (632671)

          Greater than average intelligence? What makes you say that? Really, if you can't understand even the rudimentary elements of calculus, why would you think you're above average, and not simply lazy, or possibly you have some kind of learning disability, which would make you decidedly BELOW average in many things?

  • They are not stars they are ori supergates opening

  • by mkcmkc (197982) on Saturday August 23, 2008 @04:44PM (#24721343)

    The paper itself was published in Science, but you'll need a subscription to read more than the abstract.

    It's ironic that of all of the ways that we as a society could choose to fund our primary scientific journal, the method we did choose is based on keeping scientific results away from people who are interested in science.

    • by teridon (139550)

      From where do you think the funding should come?

      Science is available at my local public library. Granted, right now it only goes back 2 years, but the library only has so much space for periodicals.

      I'm a bit lucky -- my place of work provides online access to nearly every scientific journal out there. Public libraries sometimes do the same thing as my place of work; i.e. you can probably access Science online from your library's computers.

    • Wrong. You have to pay for food too. That doesn't mean someone is keeping it away from you. It just means you have to give something to get something. Food for money, science for money.

      But yeah, copyright gets in the way here. One more reason to abolish it.

      • by arminw (717974)

        ...Food for money, science for money....

        Except that most of science that is written up in these journals is paid for by the taxpayers. Then these elite so called "scientific journals" where this taxpayer supported work is reported, charge exorbitant fees for said taxpayers to have access to the fundamental work the taxpayer has paid for already. I think that all scientific reports which contain even one red cent's worth of science done at taxpayers expense should be free to all taxpayers.

    • by vikstar (615372)

      People interested in science enter research careers and have access from their universities or research organisations. People who are not scientists but are interested in science will use these resources for entertainment purposes, not to advance the body of knowledge. To this end, you do not need to subscribe, you can purchase the article for US$10.

      • by lennier (44736)

        "People interested in science enter research careers and have access from their universities or research organisations. People who are not scientists but are interested in science will use these resources for entertainment purposes, not to advance the body of knowledge."

        Sheesh. With that attitude, do you seriously wonder *why* people in the street think scientists are 'elitists'? No scruffy unwashed masses allowed in OUR little club, no sir. They might be ENTERTAINED by knowledge! The horror! Knowledge must

        • by vikstar (615372)

          What are you talking about? They are allowed, you can pay $10 for the article. This is pretty cheap for an article. Universities and research organisation have to pay for the subscriptions. Can you go to a bookstore and lift a book of the shelf and just walk out without paying? Maybe you think the music industry is elitist requiring you to pay $1 for each song?

          Also, many scientists have their own versions of submitted papers on their website, if they are allowed, which you can download and read. It is the p

      • Not all of us grew up in wealthy families. For me, $10 per article might as well have been $10000 per article...

  • but you'll need a subscription to read more than the abstract.

    So in other words I'll have to give my email address to YET another anonymous entity in the hope that they'll just send me information relative to the topic I was originally interested in, and NOT sell my email address along with a million others to the closest available spammer who wants to make my "appendage" more appealing to the female populous ... What are the odds ?

    You know, I am SO TIRED of having to sign up for everything with my email a

    • by rossdee (243626)

      "So in other words I'll have to give my email address to YET another anonymous entity"

      For an anonymous entity you use an anonymous email addy (hotmail, gmail, yahoo etc)

      and I for one welcome our anonymous, star creating, overlord entity that lives near black holes.

    • by Noren (605012)
      I have good news and bad news. The good news is that no email address is needed to subscribe to Science magazine!

      The bad news is that you'll have to pay for it. This is not NY Times, this is actual cash. You need to use a different rant for this one.
  • The nice thing about how computer models are used in astrophysics is that we don't set public policy by them. It's especially nice that these models actually match observed phenomenon.

As far as we know, our computer has never had an undetected error. -- Weisert

Working...