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Biotech Science

Potential Cure For Antibiotic Resistant Infections 127

Posted by kdawson
from the early-days-but-promising dept.
kpw10 writes to let us know about research to be published this week that offers hope in the battle against multi-drug-resistant bacteria. "Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have discovered that two drugs used to treat bone loss in old folks can both kill and short-circuit the 'sex life' of antibiotic-resistant bacteria blamed for nearly 100,000 hospital deaths across the country each year."
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Potential Cure For Antibiotic Resistant Infections

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  • by ScrewMaster (602015) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @06:02PM (#19818871)
    what happens when the bugs become resistant to these two drugs as well?
    • Then we find new drugs.

      At the very least, I would not be surprised if the constantly mutating virus is actually opening itself up to new attack vectors that we just haven't found yet.
      • Bacteria != viruses (Score:5, Informative)

        by mattcasters (67972) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @07:00PM (#19819531) Homepage
        Just a nitpick, but anti-biotics don't really help fight against viruses.

        • Re: (Score:1, Informative)

          by Telcontar (819)
          They help indirectly: In cases of a viral infection, antibiotics are prescribed to wipe out bacteria that keep the immune system tied up and busy. While those bacteria were not strong enough to make you sick, antibiotics are a defense on that front, allowing your immune system to focus on viruses.

          Of course, antibiotics also kill useful bacteria (e.g. those that help you to digest milk and salad), so antibiotics are not really a good idea against a common cold.
          • by ColdWetDog (752185) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @10:08PM (#19820971) Homepage

            In cases of a viral infection, antibiotics are prescribed to wipe out bacteria that keep the immune system tied up and busy.

            Huh? That's not even wrong. There is no reason to use antibiotics in a viral infection. Period. Now, there are a couple of real life caveats to this: Firstly, viral infections can alter host defenses (usually by trashing the lining of the respiratory system - essentially making holes in it - which allow bacteria to invade. The classic case is Haemophilus Influenza pneumonia that occurs after an influenza infection. Secondly and more commonly, a doctor may not know if the infection is viral or bacterial and antibiotics are often (likely too often) added empirically.

            But bacteria "don't keep the immune system busy".

      • I would bet that the same method by which bacteria become resistant to drugs also causes them to lose that resistance after a period of time.

        Granted that strain would have to be NOT exposed to the antibiotic for a long enough timeframe for it to lose it's resistance (enough time for the mutations that don't have the resistance to become the majority).

        This is probably a high estimate, but I would imagine that if you banned penicillin for 200 years or so, you would wind up finding that the strains that were r
        • by joto (134244)
          Actually, you don't need 200 years, as bacteria reproduce rapidly. Assuming the infection is non-lethal, and you can afford to stay off medication for a few months, the bacteria population will almost certainly no longer be antibiotica-resistant after this time. But then again, if you can live with the infection for that long, why bother treating it at all?
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by tloh (451585)
      prepare for the headline - "Netcraft confirms it: The human race is dying."
      • by tloh (451585)
        On a more serious note, what are the chances that bacteria will evolve a new way to have sex to circumvent this? And what would you call these new kinky perverts? Okay, so maybe the notion of bacterial sexual freedom isn't so serious.
    • The problem that is said to cause drug resistant bacteria is over use - too many people taking the drug when they don't really need it to kill bacteria. And in this case the "cure" we're being offered is a drug that's in even wider use, now it will not only be used to treat the resistant drugs but will continue to be used widely to treat bone loss in old people (senile citizens). So it's not just a matter of what happens when the bugs become resistant, but that the resistance is on a fast track!
      • From what I see, the drug stops the bacteria from reproducing, meaning that the quick lifespan of the bacteria won't help it adapt, since it won't be able to pass on resistant traits.
        • by mooingyak (720677) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @06:17PM (#19819079)
          ... except for that fraction of a percent that's immune to the drug and can breed anyway, and then we start all over again.
          • by Knara (9377)
            I dunno, wouldn't pretty much every one of the bacteria have to reproduce the exact same way?
            • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

              by poopdeville (841677)
              More-or-less. There are certainly variations, but there might be critical points in the process that are the same across all bacteria. If a drug targets those, we win. Evolution could help bacteria survive, but there wouldn't be any evolutionary pressure to change this aspect of bacterial reproduction outside exposure to the antibiotic.

              An analogy might be something like VX nerve gas and human evolution. We might some day evolve so that VX nerve gas won't affect our nervous systems, but it won't be throu
              • Hang on there! This logic of combinations of drugs and such has been tried for a long time. The results always rapidly decline in value. Even if this combination works for now, it will fail in a short period of time.

                There is a better way! the USA Laser [usalaser.biz] guys have a tool that could best be described as the Atom Bomb of medicine. It is a very simple system that exposes a person to an intense short duration flash from an IR laser. This device does several wonderful things. The first is that it essentia

              • by joto (134244)

                An analogy might be something like VX nerve gas and human evolution. We might some day evolve so that VX nerve gas won't affect our nervous systems, but it won't be through exposure to VX, since we basically die instantly if we're exposed. On the other hand, it seems unlikely that we would evolve that way.

                Not true. VX gas in small enough doses doesn't kill. Let's assume a doomsday scenario where the evil robots in the future use VX gas to keep humans away. More or less the entire planet is routinely "clea

            • by Winckle (870180)
              Bacteria can reproduce both sexually and asexualy, also they exchange plasmids of DNA.

              Life will find a way to survive.
        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by cin62 (1050660)
          Bacteria can take up "free" DNA that's somewhere in the environment (possibly a residue of a dead bacteria). So basically the resistant bacteria does not need to be alive to pass on the resistance genes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transformation_(genet ics) [wikipedia.org]
      • by Moraelin (679338) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @07:05PM (#19819585) Journal
        Now I'm not a doctor, but it seems to me that (as is usually the case) it's not that simple. Among the things that come to mind:

        1. Drug resistant bacteria aren't as much caused by taking too many antibiotics, but by taking too little of an antibiotic. People take the antibiotic for 2-3 days, then they feel better, and figure out "why bother taking the rest?" Or they take an antibiotic, it makes them feel worse, skip the rest of the treatment because they know better than the doctor. Etc.

        Problem is, they have a shitload of bacteria left at that point.

        Will someone decide to skip their bone loss drugs too? Probably, but I'd assume somewhat fewer.

        2. The fact that it's already widely used to treat bone loss, should probably tell us that if it was that easy to develop resistance to it, it would have happened already. Not saying it's impossible to, but it might just take a lot more time.

        3. The relatively fast development of resistance is massively aided by the fact that bacteria can exchange genes. (Hence the jab about inhibiting their sex life.) So basically once one develops resistance, it can pass that around.

        Something that attacks that very mechanism, might slow down the rate of developing and spreading resistance a lot.
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by a-zarkon! (1030790)
          To add on to point 1 above: Any evidence or anecdotes regarding people who can't afford a full course of antibiotics or who complete a course of antibiotic xxx but find themselves still sick and can't pay for a second round with antibiotic yyy? Looking at the prices of prescriptions (even the copay on some of this stuff with insurance) I can easily see where there could be tough decisions for low/fixed income types.
          • Thankfully I haven't had to deal with too many prescription medications yet. I'm relatively healthy.

            However, aren't most of the 'expensive' drugs the ones that are more cosmetic? Things like Viagra, or the sleeping meds, or anti-allergy types?

            I have always thought that the antibiotic type drugs were relatively inexpensive. Am I off on this assumption?
            • by Uzuri (906298)
              They always try to put you on the newest ones, which are more expensive. If you buck that, and tell them that that won't work for you, you can usually get an incredibly cheap generic.

              But you need backbone, and when you're sick... well, you generally don't have the energy to argue with the doctor.
        • by ColdWetDog (752185) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @10:22PM (#19821037) Homepage

          1. Drug resistant bacteria aren't as much caused by taking too many antibiotics, but by taking too little of an antibiotic. People take the antibiotic for 2-3 days, then they feel better, and figure out "why bother taking the rest?" Or they take an antibiotic, it makes them feel worse, skip the rest of the treatment because they know better than the doctor. Etc.

          That's part of the problem, the bigger problem is that there are too many antibiotics being used for essentially superfluous indications such as when used in cattle feed and for clearly viral infections. In fact, the data on exactly how long one should be on antibiotics for a given infection is pretty sparse. Remember that the host immune system is playing an active role in clearing the infection - it's not just the antibiotic, and once you gain the upper hand, it's bye-bye bug.

          1. Drug resistant bacteria aren't as much caused by taking too many antibiotics, but by taking too little of an antibiotic. People take the antibiotic for 2-3 days, then they feel better, and figure out "why bother taking the rest?" Or they take an antibiotic, it makes them feel worse, skip the rest of the treatment because they know better than the doctor. Etc.

          Now this is interesting because you're correct - At least one of the drugs has been marketed for several years. If they prevented antibiotic resistance, it should be possible to see this given enough patients and time. The problem is that we don't have any way to really track this on a grand scale. It may be possible for organizations like Kaiser Permanente, who can track drug use and outcome data, to see this. It may also be the case that this is yet another Test Tube Marvel that has little applicability to the real world.

          3. The relatively fast development of resistance is massively aided by the fact that bacteria can exchange genes. (Hence the jab about inhibiting their sex life.) So basically once one develops resistance, it can pass that around.

          As far as I can tell from the terribly written summary, that's what the drugs do - prevent plasmid reproduction. The problem here is that there are several mechanisms for plasmid / gene transfer among the various species of bacteria. There may be mechanisms that are not susceptible to these drugs.

          • by Moraelin (679338)
            Once the immune system gets the upper hand, yes. But sometimes the immune system never gets the upper hand in those aborted treatments, or not completely. For example, Staphylococcus Aureus often just gets more or less isolated in a pus bag, and the immune system can't finish it off, or it takes a long time to finish it off. What could look like an abcess finally healing, could well be just reducing its size and having a recurring infection later.
        • by ji777 (1107063)

          2. The fact that it's already widely used to treat bone loss, should probably tell us that if it was that easy to develop resistance to it, it would have happened already. Not saying it's impossible to, but it might just take a lot more time.

          Or it simply suggests that normal flora bacteria found in everyone have already developed resistance... Everyone has bacteria that should be there as part of a healthy system. It's just not noticed since it's not detrimental. If the normal flora have developed resistance then there is nothing to prevent other bacteria from doing so as well. And just a bit of clarification: Resistance doesn't really happen as a result of treatment. Resistant or partially resistant bacteria exist at the point treatment

        • by rthille (8526)
          I'm not a doctor either, but I'm smart enough to take all the antibiotics I'm prescribed. Trouble is, that may not be enough. I'm on my 3rd different perscription for a sinus infection right now. First was amoxicillin, then cipro, and now Avelox. I got 7 days into the 10 of amoxicillin and felt worse. Called the doctor and got a perscription for the cipro. After the full 10 days of cipro, I felt way better, but I still had a bit of 'color' in my snot, so I went back to see the doctor. That time they g
    • just put them in an autoclave.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      what happens when the bugs become resistant to these two drugs as well?

      But that would imply that these organisms evolve. That's impossible! [ucomics.com]

    • by camperslo (704715)
      We'll get bone-eating bacteria?
  • It's always good to see existing drugs being used in new ways, because it shortens the amount of time it takes to get the treatment to market.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by OwenDMoney (963991)

      In other news, Viagra has been shown to reduce bone lose in old men.

      No comment,

      OwenDMoney

  • by filesiteguy (695431) <kai@perfectreign.com> on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @06:05PM (#19818911) Homepage

    discovered that two drugs used to treat bone loss in old folks can both kill and short-circuit the 'sex life' of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    Um, doesn't marriage do the same thing?

    Just asking, because it would certainly save a lot of money if we just get these bacteria to marry.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      That only short-circuits the sex life between the two that are married.
    • by Billosaur (927319) *

      Yes, but they'd have to marry in a state which didn't require a blood test.

    • by AuMatar (183847) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @06:19PM (#19819093)
      There are no male and female bacteria. Therefor that would be gay marriage. Do you support gay marriage? Why do you hate Jesus and America?
    • by Nexcis (962706)
      Because bacteria have no sex would that not be a same sex marriage? I think G Dub would have quite a few insightful thoughts about your idea.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Because we must protect the sanctity of marriage! Marriage must be between a man and a woman. Do you want to explain the bacterial couple next door to your kids? I know I don't.

      Next you'll be pushing your agenda with books like "Johnny has Streptococcal Pharyngitis For a Daddy". For shame.
    • polled bacteria cites child support issues as the number 1 matrimony deterrant.
    • Re: (Score:1, Redundant)

      by Penguinshit (591885)

      discovered that two drugs used to treat bone loss in old folks can both kill and short-circuit the 'sex life' of antibiotic-resistant bacteria


      Viagra and Cialis are antibiotic?
    • by DrCode (95839)
      Just asking, because it would certainly save a lot of money if we just get these bacteria to marry.

      You've obviously never paid for a wedding.
    • All I saw was "kill and short circuit the sex life" and "old folks". Now you're telling me it's a cure for drug-resistant bacteria? Win-win.
  • so the drugs prevent genetic transer through the sex pilli so that the bacteria can not share genes and recombine them into new genes/phenotypes. that isnt a cure, it will slow thigns down but really I doubt all the drug resistant bacteria are suceptable to it and even if they were it will eventually be overcome and as a defense, become meaningless. now if we found a way to make bacteriophages induce this effect in bacteria THEN we might have a chance. viruses mutate and evolve along with their hosts and
    • by wytcld (179112) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @06:18PM (#19819085) Homepage
      You didn't read the whole article. The drugs were initially tested for the property of blocking the transfer of genes for multiple drug resistance. But they were surprised to find that it specifically killed those bacteria which had already received the upgrade package. Multiple drug resistance is evidently a specific trick - not multiple resistances to multiple drugs, but a single resistance mechanism that blocks nearly all drugs, and that can be passed from one species of bacteria to others. These newly-tested but available drugs kill any bacteria which have adopted that mechanism.
      • You didn't read the whole article. The drugs were initially tested for the property of blocking the transfer of genes for multiple drug resistance. But they were surprised to find that it specifically killed those bacteria which had already received the upgrade package.
        That's not the DARPA chief!
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by smellsofbikes (890263)
        I haven't read the article because for some reason our corporate firewall doesn't like it (but it's cool with slashdot: ??!?)

        Anyway, I know there are multiple paths for drug resistance.
        Generally speaking, antibiotics target a specific enzyme or pathway. Take penicillin: it inhibits an enzyme used in linking sugars used in building the cell wall. To evade this, some bacteria make beta-lactamases, enzymes that specifically attack and break down penicillin, while other bacteria just massively overproduce the
  • by tinrobot (314936) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @06:12PM (#19819017)
    So, the few bugs that escape this new form of microbial torture will simply become stronger and even more resistant. Great. I am not a biologist, but are there any other ways of getting around this war of escalation?

    Maybe scientists could find some other critter that the bugs like better, like cockroaches or the small dogs that live in women's purses.
    • yes. bacteria can be killed by bacteriophages which the Russians had used a lot due to antibiotics being less available and the viruses constantly evolve along side the bacteria. when the bacteria evolve to fight the virus, the viruses evolve back- a constant tug of war beween them that has managed to work for the last well, several billion years. as for making better targets that the bacteria like better than us, that is a very good idea. in fact, those sort of experiments may be taking place here in a
    • I'd donate my step-daughter's little shi^H^H^Hdog for testing.
  • by TheMohel (143568) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @06:13PM (#19819031) Homepage
    I'm a skeptic about a lot of things in medicine (I live in that world), especially "wonder drugs", and the writer of TFA demonstrates his limited skills in microbiology enough to make me cringe. But the science here is going to be fun to see.

    Don't get me wrong - we need to know the doses, the regimen, the side effects at antimicrobial dosing, and all the rest of the nuts-and-bolts pharmacology. On the other hand, the putative mechanism, which is to interfere with sharing of genes between bacteria, is in itself ground-breaking. Used properly (that is, not overused and used with care), this could prevent rapid resistance emergence in bacteria where the treatment itself takes weeks to months (osteomyelitis, for example, or infection with certain stubborn bugs). These drugs (etidronate and pamidronate) have their own not-insignificant side effect profile, of course, and there are no guarantees at this stage.

    I'll be interested in the actual research, because TFA is filtered through a layer of ignorance and sensationalism, but it sounds interesting.
    • ... because TFA is filtered through a layer of ignorance and sensationalism ...

      Which means it is in no way different from the bulk of Slashdot submissions.
    • "Used properly (that is, not overused and used with care)"

      Maybe in America where everything needs a script (800mg ibuprofen.. come on) but not in other countries where you can buy antibiotics in a super saver 500 pill bottle. I believe this is how the problem started in the first place.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        the problem started in the first place.
        Depends on which problem "the problem" is. If the FDA continues to approve the most powerful antibiotics known to man to cows in order to keep their diseased, scraggly bodies alive long enough to pass an inspection and become your dinner, then when you get infected by e.coli from these beasts, there simply will not be a treatment, you will die.
    • by The Elephant (1095025) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @10:29PM (#19821073)
      This article provides a more thorough and scientific explanation. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/07070 9171636.htm [sciencedaily.com]
  • by loteck (533317) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @06:18PM (#19819087) Homepage
    ...also a proven way to virtually extinguish one's sex life.
    • by jimbug (1119529)
      When I first skimmed the /. summary, the words 'sex-life' and 'old people' jumped out at me. Needless to say, I was very intrigued.
  • Hopefully the doctors who prescribe this new cure won't just pump the environment full of it at any sign of anything wrong, the way generations of their fellow doctors have antibiotics to create today's resistant "superbugs". Every time around this treadmill it's harder to kill the new superbugs, and the more people get sick and die from them.
    • by TheMohel (143568) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @06:51PM (#19819457) Homepage
      Always a concern, but the trend in medicine over the past decade or so has been to reduce the number of times we prescribe, even as we increase both the dose and duration of care when we do pull the trigger. Antibiotic resistance has been strongly linked to inadequate dosing (killing only the susceptible bugs, while letting the borderline-resistant clones reinforce themselves), as well as to courses too short or patient noncompliance.

      Patients are part of the problem too, since there is a tendency (cultural in some cases, personal in others) to demand that a doctor "do something" to fix the problem. Antibiotics were perceived for a long time as something harmless to give in those circumstances, but that perception is fading fast. If anything, the trend now is to err on the side of letting things play out a little more to see if antibiotic therapy is really needed.

      This has also caused physicians to have to explain the situation better. I know for myself that when I am explaining to a suspicious parent the reason that I'm not going to give their child an antibiotic for their viral infection, I don't waste a lot of time explaining resistance. If they already understand resistance, they're not asking for antibiotics. If they don't, it just sounds like I'm making things up. I focus instead on side effects and cost, and my typical (true) statement is "about all I can do with antibiotics would be to give your child diarrhea to go with her cold." This is surprisingly effective, especially in the parents of non-potty-trained toddlers.

      None of which stops me from pulling out the stops when I'm faced with a septic kid or a real infection that needs to be nuked. In those cases, though, I'm very careful to make sure that the regimen I use is appropriate, considering the resistance patterns and the risk of making them worse.

      Now if we could only get the idiots who lace animal feed with antibiotics to do the same. Ever wonder where resistant strains start? Hint: it ain't just in the hospitals.
      • by Chris Burke (6130)
        Antibiotic resistance has been strongly linked to inadequate dosing (killing only the susceptible bugs, while letting the borderline-resistant clones reinforce themselves), as well as to courses too short or patient noncompliance.

        I didn't used to understand this well, thinking that basically you're still going to leave some bacteria alive, and they're going to be the most-uber-resistant bacteria of them all. But someone pointed out what may be obvious, which is that after the full regiment there are going
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by TheMohel (143568)

          But someone pointed out what may be obvious, which is that after the full regiment there are going to be few enough of these bacteria left that the human immune system can finish the job of wiping them out completely, leaving no antibiotic-resistant bacteria at all. Is this accurate?

          In essence, yes. In fact, people who have immune deficiencies are particularly likely to develop resistant bugs, and we suspect that at least part of the problem is that the immune system can't quite finish the job.

        • This is true, but the thing to remember is, while those germs are alive, it is still possible to pass them to a new host.

          Sure, your body is kicking bacterial ass, but that last cough or sneeze that they manage to wring out of you could spew a few lucky winners into a coworkers face, and the cycle starts again, but with a slightly more resistant strain.
      • "Ever wonder where resistant strains start? Hint: it ain't just in the hospitals."

        Mexico? My mother in law works at a farm that produces fruit with a lot of immagrant worker.. they routinely go back to Mexico to see family and pick her up Antibiotics because she likes to pop a few when she has a cold (yes a few, yes a cold).

        I had her get me some because i regularly get bronchitis (I smoke) and when it gets infected it's hard to get doctors to prescribe antibiotics. she brought me a bottle of 500 tablets. N
        • by TheMohel (143568) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @08:22PM (#19820189) Homepage
          Yep. I've got patients who do the same (I live in an area where we have a lot of Hispanic immigrants, legal and otherwise). Nothing I can do about it except to talk with them, which I do. I try to encourage them to be reasonable and to take an entire course when they start one (nothing's worse than an occasional antibiotic pill). I have mixed success, but I don't expect perfection and I think my attitude helps the situation. I do get a lot of "do you suggest I start this" kinds of calls and questions and I treat those calls as victories.

          This gets me into the whole doctor-as-gatekeeper-for-pills thing that drives me nuts. I challenge colleagues once in a while: in an environment where all medications were available at retail, could they still justify their fees? Could they market themselves well enough to avoid starvation? I think I could, because of the kind of medicine I practice (and because I can sometimes go a dozen patients between giving a prescription), but it's definitely something honest physicians should be asking themselves.

          In the no-Rx-required environment, though, there's no question that resistance emerges rapidly. Fortunately, the antibiotics available in Mexico are a small subset of the ones we use here, and most of the ones that patients can buy OTC have broad therapeutic indices (overdose doesn't hurt you much) and are from antibiotic classes (penicillins, macrolides) where we have later-generation alternatives that avoid the common resistances. It's a fluid situation, though, and one that has infectious disease specialists always a little on edge.
      • by Peale (9155)
        As a doctor, I urge you to read these sites:

        http://www.fluoroquinolones.org/ [fluoroquinolones.org]
        http://www.antibiotics.org/ [antibiotics.org]

        And pass this knowledge along. I, along with many many other people, have to live in pain now because of this.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      I hate to have to tell you this, but fewer people get sick and die from the "superbugs" than died from their predecessors. Despite what you were taught or at least led to believe, as a general rule, antibiotic resistant bacteria are not "stronger" than the non-antibiotic resistant versions. That is why you very rarely hear of someone getting infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria outside of a hospital. Antibiotic resistant bacteria are at a significant competitive disadvantage when no antibiotics are p
      • by Doc Ruby (173196)
        I didn't say the superbugs were more lethal than antibiotic-sensitive strains, or anything else except that they are antibiotic resistant.

        I don't know where you get your stats from, but antibiotic-resistant pathogens [wikipedia.org] are a serious health threat. Unless there is specific evidence that resistance mechanisms offer significant disadvantages to competing with sensitive strains, then it's pretty clear that the resistance to a lethal environmental element is an advantage, and that the resistant strain will eventua
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          Most (if not all) antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria accomplish this resistance by disabling the protein which the antibiotic attacks. The reason they had said protein in the first place was because it offered a significant competitive advantage. To be precise, the protein in question in most cases has to do with carrying chemicals across the cell membrane. The bacteria are significantly less efficient at transferring chemicals across the cell membrane without the protein that they have deactivated to
          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            That's not necessarily true- there are quite a few ways bacteria have become resistant to drugs- because there are quite a few different drug targets scientists have tried.

            Before even penicillin, there were the miraculous sulfa drugs, which block a bacteria's ability to make folic acid: bacteria learned to uptake folate just as we do.

            Beta-lactams like penicillin prevent bacteria from making peptidoglycan, the material of their cell walls: bacteria came up with beta-lactamase to break it down.

            Better b

            • I am sorry I over simplified in making my point. The fact remains that antibiotic resistant bacteria, in general (there may be a few exceptions, but I am unaware of any), have a more difficult time overcoming the body's immune system than non antibiotic resistant bacteria.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      Actually, it would be unwise to prescribe these drugs recklessly for another reason- the bisphosphonates, the class of compounds which these two drugs belong to, can have a rather serious side effect when taken in high doses for long periods. Bisphosphonates taken in high doses for long periods can cause osteonecrosis of the jaw, though it should be noted that etidronate and clodronate are older drugs with far less potency than newer drugs in the class like alendronate and zoledronic acid.
  • both kill and short-circuit the 'sex life' Do they extract the drug from slashdot readers? :-P
  • by CrankyOldBastard (945508) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @07:10PM (#19819621)
    It's easy to be a sceptic and ask about 'and what about when the bugs become resistant to this'. As a person who had his life ruined by MRSA, I know too well the impact these types of infection have on individuals and families. Anything that can extend the reach of antibiotics (particularly the less toxic ones - I was only 2 or 3 days off being killed by the antibiotic that beat my infection) and decrease the chance of resistance is a good thing.

    Hopefully this won't be used promiscuously, and I hope they'll work out the interactions with other treatments, as quite often treatment is multi-modal.

    I wouldn't wish what I go through due to MRSA on anyone (except my stepfather, but that's another story altogether.
    • So where's DisturbedChildhood(-1) when you need it?
      • This happened to me 10 years ago. My childhood was a lot further back than that, and was no more disturbed than most kids of the early 60's. The late 60's - well the acid was good then. That got a bit disturbing at times.
  • in simple life forms, such as bacteria, the mutations neccesary to change the organism in a useful way can happen in far fewer generations. combined with the speed at which these ateria reproduce it is only a matter of time before they adapt to this new treatment. the trick is staying ahead of them-- which is difficult.
  • 100K deaths (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anomalyst (742352)
    100K deaths per year, thats more than an order of magnitude than the number of deaths attributed to terrorism in the last decade. Why are they telling us terrorists are dangerous? Imagine the lives saved if we poured half a trillion dollars to combat this, plus no armed forces casualties and no need to tap our phones or sniff our internet traffic.
  • I'm glad to hear that there is a new avenue, but as stated, there's no certainty that resistance couldn't be acquired to these drugs. Right now, bacterial infections that are resistant to multiple kinds of antibiotics are still a small portion of infections in general, and new antibiotics help too.

    But ultimately the best way to prevent this is for people NOT to insist on being given antibiotics for infections that are probably viral, for people to not stop taking their antibiotics when the symptoms are
  • by djupedal (584558) on Tuesday July 10, 2007 @08:43PM (#19820351)
    ...but until you've had an opportunity to get up close and personal with CA-MRSA, you DO NOT know how much fun you are missing.

    Starts out like an ingrown hair or pimple. Might even be a spider bite. Then it gets angry. Take a large marble...light it on fire and have it surgically planted underneath, say, two layers of skin. Day three and the redness is now inches in diameter and the bump is still growing and...damn! It hurts! Burns like hell! Pimple my ass! Get that thing out of there! You can't sleep from the pain and you find yourself wondering which would be the better method to dig it out: kitchen cutlery or claw-hammer. In any case, if you don't have a doctor lance it, you're going to have to do it yourself.

    Day four and it is open, draining and talk about cheese!! The stuff draining from the now open wound is so toxic, it blisters the surrounding skin. Makes it a bit difficult to remember to trash your clothes, bedsheets, etc., but at least the burning has lessened...a bit.

    Ten or twelve days later, after finally getting on an anti-biotic (tetracycline?) that can put up a fight, the fluid draining out is almost stopped, the redness is almost gone and a bit of scar tissue is starting to form. Good news is, now that you know the routine, you can put up a slightly better fight next time - and there will be a next time...unless you died from this incident, of course. You did wash your hands before you helped your kids get dressed this morning, right...?
    • by Renraku (518261)
      MRSA isn't particular more potent than other staph infections. They just won't die easily. That and your body has very little experience fighting MRSA itself.
  • http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL9910/S00096.htm [scoop.co.nz]
    "Phage Therapy: where communism succeeded and capitalism failed. Western capitalism has another kind of correctness that can be at least as disabling; a correctness based on profit, and an unwillingness to check the growth of an industry that is too lucrative to too many people. The story of antibiotics is becoming one of those stories. An elementary application of Evolution 101 tells us that bacteria evolve. In an antibiotic-rich environment, selective pressu
  • ...nearly 100,000 hospital deaths across the country each year.

    Hurry! Get this medicine to Andorra [wikipedia.org] before it's too late!

  • And they figured this out how? The obvious thought is that the old people with bone loss weren't dying nearly as fast as the other, otherwise, healthy patients.
  • I myself spent six months in a hospital after being diagnosed w/ MRSA. Actually, I should clarify that and state that at first they treated it as a NON-methycillin resistant Staph A. infection using heavy doses of a pretty tough antibiotic....only after weeks of therapy when they found it continued to spread (I had endocarditis...and it had also spread to two vertebrae in my neck causing temporary paralysis, my knees, my lungs, etc....it was everywhere) they finally realized they had to switch to a new drug

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