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Science Technology

New Sub Dives To Crushing Depths 245

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the deeper-and-longer dept.
University of Washington Scientists are reporting that they have a new autonomous underwater vehicle that increases both the attainable depth and duration of deployment over current submersibles. Weighing in at just under 140 pounds, the "Deepglider" is able to stay out to sea for up to a year and hit depths of almost 9,000 feet. "Deepglider opens up new research possibilities for oceanographers studying global climate change. The glider's first trip revealed unexpected warming of water near the ocean floor, and scientists are interested in studying whether the temperatures are related to global warming."
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New Sub Dives To Crushing Depths

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  • Serious question (Score:3, Insightful)

    by zyl0x (987342) on Monday February 26, 2007 @03:21PM (#18157002)
    How would global warming, if it even exists as people say it does, affect the temperature of water on the ocean floor?
  • Not that deep... (Score:1, Insightful)

    by rkww (675767) on Monday February 26, 2007 @03:22PM (#18157010)
    The Marianas Trench [wikipedia.org] is 35,813 feet (11521 metres) deep, according to the submariners who went to the bottom of it. So how is this new submersible in any way special?
  • by SuseLover (996311) on Monday February 26, 2007 @03:31PM (#18157140)
    So, the very first question is weather this is related to global warming or not. What about.. Or it may be due to hot magma underneath or some previously unknown "conveyor belt"?

    Not jumping to conclusions or anything, are we??
  • by High Hat (618572) on Monday February 26, 2007 @03:32PM (#18157164)
    Well under the assumption that global warming has an effect on ocean streams this could be a possibility.

    Obviously heat radiated from the core of the Earth is a much more likely cause...

  • It gets grants (Score:4, Insightful)

    by EmbeddedJanitor (597831) on Monday February 26, 2007 @03:33PM (#18157176)
    Scientists sell too. They need funding to feed their families and buy machines than go beep. They need to use teaser language to get people interested in their work to get funding.
  • So, the very first question is weather this is related to global warming or not. What about.. Or it may be due to hot magma underneath or some previously unknown "conveyor belt"?

    Not jumping to conclusions or anything, are we??

    No. We have a mat for that. The "Global Warming" square is right next to the "Violent Videogames" and "Acts of Terror" squares. You cant miss it.

  • Progress? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by PhotoGuy (189467) on Monday February 26, 2007 @03:59PM (#18157536) Homepage
    It always amazes me, that we (well, humankind that is, I can't take all the credit) managed to dive to almost 40,000 feet with the Challenger [wikipedia.org] in *1951*, but haven't been back or deeper since! There is so much to explore on our own planet, and so much effort is being placed into going out into a vast, mostly empty vacuum, instead of looking under our own massive oceans, which are teeming with life (almost a new form, ever time we look at it).

    The discoveries we are likely to make under our oceans, are undoubtedly going to be of far more relevance and benefit to our own lives on this little planet, that anything we find "out there." Yes, I think we should do both, but I think the depths of our oceans are severely and disproportionately neglected, except for the odd diving renegade.
  • by mrcdeckard (810717) on Monday February 26, 2007 @04:01PM (#18157560) Homepage

    why is it that topics like global warming (and evolution for that matter), everyone thinks they know better than someone whom has (presumably) studied the topic for years by dismissing them as saying what they "cause it sells newspapers/magazines"?

    i'm not saying that your theory is wrong (or that the scientist is right), but assessing validity between A) a random poster on /. and B) a researcher at u of w, i think i may be inclined to believe the scientist.

    sorry, not to pick on you, but it amazes me how often politicians, theologians, pundits, etc., spout their opinions as if it carries more weight than someone who has dedicated their life studying the subject. if it turns out that science is wrong, then the truth will bear out, and any scientist worth their salt will be the first to say it's wrong -- i also suspect that most scientists *are* worth their salt.

    modern science has benefited humanity in so many ways, yet people deny it when it goes against their opinions/politics.

    mr c
  • Global Warming? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by cdn-programmer (468978) <terrNO@SPAMterralogic.net> on Monday February 26, 2007 @04:34PM (#18158028)
    Why do they think they have to toss in a comment on Global Warming?

    Then...

    Consider that the oceanic currents have cycle times measured in 1000's of years. Depending on where they are diving, if they are finding unexpected warming then this would mean that mankind would not be responsible for any presumed planetary warming... since the temperature of the water they are measuring was determined centuries ago.

    However, closer examination of such a silly statment leaves one with a question... If they had to send this new fangled sub down to measure the temperature then what did they use before and if they didn't have anything to use before then did they really measure the temperature? If not - then one could say the temperature is unexpected but one could certainly not conclude it is warmer or colder since it hasn't been measured before.

    Of course, I think the idea that Global Warming should be part of the story is kinda silly to begin with.

    If I get modded down because of these observations then it just proves there is a huge knee jerk reaction going on by people who don't really think about things.
  • by MikeHunt69 (695265) on Tuesday February 27, 2007 @08:06AM (#18165188) Journal
    Awesome info, thanks for sharing.

I bet the human brain is a kludge. -- Marvin Minsky

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