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Re: Daylight Saving Time, I would most like

Displaying poll results.
... to see it ended, full stop.
  19108 votes / 74%
... to extend its duration.
  1555 votes / 6%
... to shorten its duration.
  343 votes / 1%
... to keep it as is.
  2106 votes / 8%
Doesn't matter; I just ignore it anyhow.
  2382 votes / 9%
25494 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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Re: Daylight Saving Time, I would most like

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  • by dkleinsc (563838) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @11:31AM (#45317577) Homepage

    The reason for it nowadays basically amounts to this: If it's light out when most people get home from work, they're more likely to go shopping.

    • by PPH (736903) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @12:49PM (#45318109)

      Makes some sense. I'd use the time to do some work or play outside. So why screw with the clocks and eliminate the after work/school daylight? We need more DST in the winter, not less. Set the clock so sunset is around 6 or 7 pm regardless of season and let sunrise fall where it may.

      • by evilviper (135110)

        Set the clock so sunset is around 6 or 7 pm regardless of season and let sunrise fall where it may.

        Umm... How, exactly, do you plan to do that? Have everyone work off of a sun-dial? Change the clocks 5-minutes at a time every week? You do realize that sunset moves around just as much as sunrise does, don't you?

        See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Greenwich_GB_DaylightChart.png [wikipedia.org]

        • Build GPS into every clock.

        • by pla (258480) on Tuesday November 05, 2013 @12:53AM (#45333463) Journal
          Umm... How, exactly, do you plan to do that? Have everyone work off of a sun-dial? Change the clocks 5-minutes at a time every week? You do realize that sunset moves around just as much as sunrise does, don't you?

          You realize, of course, that our current system of time zones exists solely for the purpose of keeping local-solar-noon somewhere between 12 and 1pm?

          Absolutely no reason exists why we couldn't use sunset-at-7pm as the solar set-point, rather than noon.
          Absolutely no reason exists why we couldn't use dawn-at-7am as the solar-set-point, rather than noon.

          We only consider "high" noon as the solar fixed point by convention. We could just as readily pick any other portion of Helios' ride as a fixed point on the clock, to equal effect. For that matter, we have the technology today to make that far, far easier - Why have DST change twice per year? We could literally have solar-noon at 12pm each and every day. And IMO, that would count as less disruptive than this 1-hour shifting bullshit.
          • by Chris Mattern (191822) on Tuesday November 05, 2013 @11:07AM (#45335667)

            Absolutely no reason exists why we couldn't use sunset-at-7pm as the solar set-point, rather than noon.
            Absolutely no reason exists why we couldn't use dawn-at-7am as the solar-set-point, rather than noon.

            Completely wrong. There's a very excellent reason to use noon. From noon to noon is always 24 hours, no matter what time of year it is. From dawn to dawn is *not* always 24 hours. From sunset to sunset is *not* always 24 hours. It varies throughout the year. This makes anything other than noon completely unsuitable as a set-point.

            • by multimediavt (965608) on Tuesday November 05, 2013 @09:48PM (#45341807)

              Absolutely no reason exists why we couldn't use sunset-at-7pm as the solar set-point, rather than noon. Absolutely no reason exists why we couldn't use dawn-at-7am as the solar-set-point, rather than noon.

              Completely wrong. There's a very excellent reason to use noon. From noon to noon is always 24 hours, no matter what time of year it is. From dawn to dawn is *not* always 24 hours. From sunset to sunset is *not* always 24 hours. It varies throughout the year. This makes anything other than noon completely unsuitable as a set-point.

              Not "Insightful". He's completely correct as he states what times would be "sunset at" or "dawn at", as you use "noon" for 12:00 PM he used 7:00 PM and 7:00 AM respectively. Although, he did mix conventions; dawn and dusk, sunrise and sunset.

            • by camperdave (969942) on Wednesday November 06, 2013 @12:45AM (#45342603) Journal

              From noon to noon is always 24 hours, no matter what time of year it is.

              Sorry, but the Earth's orbit isn't a circle, and that means that the noon-to-noon time actually does vary day by day over the year; by as much as 16+ minutes.

        • by Lumpy (12016) on Tuesday November 05, 2013 @11:47AM (#45336109) Homepage

          Easy, simply use retrorockets to tilt the earth back up and get rid of that damned tilt that is causing all the problems.

      • This (Score:4, Insightful)

        by kf4lhp (461232) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @09:52PM (#45321637) Homepage

        Let's keep DST and dump standard time. Sucks coming home from work at sunset. Can't get outside and exercise any during the week because of work. Ugh.

        • Re:This (Score:5, Insightful)

          by dreamchaser (49529) on Monday November 04, 2013 @08:00AM (#45323909) Homepage Journal

          You require light in order to exercise? Interesting. I'd rather see DST completely abolished.

          • by Kookus (653170)

            Running through Detroit during the daytime is risky enough... At night? I might as well take a bar of soap and a tub of petroleum jelly with me!

        • Re:This (Score:5, Funny)

          by Xtifr (1323) on Monday November 04, 2013 @07:41PM (#45331467) Homepage

          And this is why I had trouble deciding how to vote. I'd prefer it to either be eliminated or extended to 100%. But I don't have a strong preference between those two.

      • by rve (4436)

        Your plan is called solar time, and it is the way time was kept before the development of mechanical clocks. The day would be divided into 12 hours at any time of year, and the length of day hours and night hours would change with the seasons.

         

      • Set the clock so high noon is at 12:00 for somewhere in the middle of your time zone and don't mess with the clocks.

        If you like to get up in the morning, get up in the morning. If you want to get up early while pretending you didn't, hide the screen on your alarm clock and get up anyway, or set a timer so your bedroom lights come on the morning before your alarm. Don't go telling the rest of us to change our clocks just because you're a wimp about getting up in the morning.

        At least now that DST is over I

    • by tverbeek (457094) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @06:13PM (#45320283) Homepage

      If it's light out when most people get home from work, they're more likely to go shopping.

      So do it year-'round.

      In one fell swoop: all the hassles, the confusion, the circadian disruption, the traffic hazards, and the annoying small-talk related to the twice-a-year time changes go away.

    • The reason for it nowadays basically amounts to this: If it's light out when most people get home from work, they're more likely to go shopping.

      I hate to break it to you, but not everyone lives their lives indoors. There are even some people who willingly participate in different outdoor activities where having ample/additional daylight in the evening is beneficial - sports, gardening, whatever.

    • An alternate name for Daylight Savings is Wartime [starwise.com]. This comes from the origin of the term and a better assumption for why it remains is that the politicians became lazy and instead of tackling difficult/important issues they found this gem to keep tweaking.

  • I'd rather end DST entirely. But there are those morons who insist that they get extra hours of sunlight in summer from DST instead of the tilt of the Earth's axis in its orbit, and there are institutions that refuse to change their 9-5 schedule into an 8-4 schedule. To accommodate them, I would consider keeping DST for the entire year.

    • by PPH (736903) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @12:44PM (#45318055)

      9-5, 8-4, whatever.

      When I was at Boeing, my boss let me work 6 to 2:30 (lunch break was on my own time). Then, I got a new boss. He literally could not figure out that I wasn't skipping out early. Must have failed "big hand, little hand" in elementary school.

      This sort of mental midget was one reason I left. And now one reason Chicago HQ is moving engineering out of Seattle.

      • by Rick Zeman (15628)

        9-5, 8-4, whatever.

        When I was at Boeing, my boss let me work 6 to 2:30 (lunch break was on my own time). Then, I got a new boss. He literally could not figure out that I wasn't skipping out early. Must have failed "big hand, little hand" in elementary school.

        This sort of mental midget was one reason I left. And now one reason Chicago HQ is moving engineering out of Seattle.

        Most businesses I've seen have "core" hours of 9-3 where everyone had to be working during those hours, so you could flex from 6:30 to 3:00 to 9:00 to 5:30.

      • by Rob the Bold (788862) on Monday November 04, 2013 @04:43PM (#45329773)

        When I was at Boeing, my boss let me work 6 to 2:30 (lunch break was on my own time). Then, I got a new boss. He literally could not figure out that I wasn't skipping out early. Must have failed "big hand, little hand" in elementary school.

        You didn't say when the boss came in to work, so I assume it was a more conventional time like 8. So when he arrives, he hasn't seen you working the past two hours, who's to say you're actually there, or if you are, not goofing off? It's not so much he can't tell time, he's just a "face time" kind of boss. You're only "working" if he sees you're there.

        Obviously that sucks for anyone -- like you -- whose schedule differs from the boss -- I was in that situation once, too. But the bright side -- if you can call it that -- is that with a "face time" boss you're usually not expected so much to produce anything as you are to be present. Raises go to the guys the boss thinks work the hardest, and that's the guys he sees the most.

    • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @06:36PM (#45320453)

      To accommodate them, I would consider keeping DST for the entire year.

      I'd go for this - or even what the Car Talk guys referred to as "double dog daylight savings" where it's a two hour jump (but year-round, I mean).

      As it is, during the winter there is a period where I leave for work while it's dark and return home afterward in the dark. To have at least a little daylight left at the end of my workday would be nice.

  • by Freshly Exhumed (105597) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @11:36AM (#45317591) Homepage

    I would like to see the complete overhaul of the time system:

    1. eliminate Daylight Savings Time
    2. replace all time zones with UTC so that the current time is expressed exactly the same regardless of geographic location, therefore no further need for the International Date Line (take that you smug Kiwis and Aussies!)
    3. there is no step three
    4. put NTP daemons & receivers on all digital electronic consumer products that are required to display the current time
    5. eliminate the concepts of AM and PM (mandatory 24-hour clock)
    6. profit!

    • by Ksevio (865461) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @11:46AM (#45317643) Homepage
      That's make things really confusing. It seems like a good idea at first, but it means stores all will have to have custom hours set. You'd end up with things like "Post Offices in former CST are open from 10-6". When you travel some place you'd have to learn all the local customs. Do people here have lunch at 19 or 20? Do stores close at 01 or 03?
      • Unlike the present, in which travelers always know the local customs, daylight saving rules, clocks on consumer electronic devices like microwaves never need manual setting, and the correct current time as determined by high accuracy clocks.

        • by Ksevio (865461)
          Correct, when I go pretty much anywhere in the world I know the work day starts around 9, lunch will be around 12, the day ends and many businesses will close around 5 or 6, then dinner will be a bit after that. Sure you can add radio receivers in all consumer electronics - it's boost the price a bit and be useless in most places since they can't receive the signal (though the recent upgrades might help). It's not really important if clocks are off by a few minutes when I'm deciding when to get lunch.
          • by Kidbro (80868)

            And by the world you mean... USA?

            I'd say breakfast spans from six to eleven, lunch from ten to four, dinner from five to twelve (yes that's a seven hour interval) depending on where I've travelled. And I've hardly ever been west of the Atlantic.

            Swapping between 17:00 and 24:00 for dinner isn't particularly easier than any other arbitrary hour, nor does knowing "lunch is at noon" help me very much.

          • Radio receivers are only one form of time sync device. GPS, GLONASS, WiFi, etc. etc. are also possible depending on the needs of the locale. Price per unit would plummet once commonplace.

      • by beh (4759) *

        To some extent you need to do that anyway - people arrive at work or go to lunch at different times in different countries... ...shop opening times vary from nation to nation - same timezone or not...

        public holidays change from nation to nation...

        And for things that are the same - all you'd need to know is the new "offset"...

        (and, yes, I've lived and worked in 3 different (European) countries - so I have first hand experience of how different things can be around here - and that is without going to cultural

    • by chihowa (366380) * on Sunday November 03, 2013 @12:24PM (#45317917)

      Remember this time people, 80 past 2 on April 47th, it's the dawn of a new enlightenment.

    • by foobar bazbot (3352433) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @02:11PM (#45318787)

      I'm with you on most points...

      4. put NTP daemons & receivers on all digital electronic consumer products that are required to display the current time

      That's just silly. In most of the continental US, such gadgets can already sync to WWVB to get the current UTC time (and to find out whether DST is in effect now, and whether it will be in effect 24 hours from now)*, and for most such gadgets, this simple unidirectional broadcast mechanism makes a lot more sense than NTP, which requires (1) unicast and (2) bi-directional.

      The correct answer is to extend such a system world-wide with a few more transmitters, not to make every device everywhere speak IP and NTP.

      *Yet, despite the bits in the time signal for exactly that purpose, I am in possession of an alarm clock that sets itself by WWVB, but has been wrong for the past two weeks, because some idiot-child programmer used a hard-coded table of start/stop dates instead of reading the current status from the signal (and using hard-coded dates as a fallback if unable to receive a WWVB frame in the 24 hours preceeding the change). This clock was sold after the most recent change in DST dates, and thus came with an extra paper in the box which explained the behavior, implied that it was Congress's fault rather than the manufacturer's, and recommending that you simply adjust the clock twice in the spring and twice in the fall. If they can't (or can't be bothered to) get this right, do you trust them with NTP?!

      • Microwave ovens, kitchen appliances, home thermostats, and a wide variety of consumer electronics devices almost always do not have the means to automatically sync their time clocks other than by manual entry, so the point stands.

    • Not sure how this would help anybody but perhaps computer programmer who would no longer need to deal with timezones.

      Current Situation:

      I need to figure out what timezone, and consequently what time it is where my friend lives in Singapore. But once I know what time it is there, I can pretty much guess what he is doing (02:00 he is probably sleeping...12:00 he is probably lunching...). I know when the "day off period" (ie. weekend) starts.

      Under your plan,

      I know it is 02:00 everywhere...but what the hell is

      • Not to mention humans most places enjoy a 5 day work/ 2 day no work schedule...

        That's what most humans' schedule looks like, but I don't know if the word "enjoy" is appropriate. How about "endure"?

    • by csumpi (2258986)
      You must be a [lazy|incompetent] [sysadmin|coder].
    • 5. eliminate the concepts of AM and PM (mandatory 24-hour clock)

      If you are going to change everything so much, why not end both the 24/60/60 and 2/12/60/60 time systems and replace it with the day as the single metric, subdivided in the usual SI manner.

      So right now, it is 2013/11/3.8479. Or 847.9md today. Give or take a few hundred microdays.

    • This is stupid. The time zone system was created to fix all the confusion of everyone having the same times when it made no sense. What are you going to do? Are you going to say 'the meeting is when it is 18:00 in Chicago' instead of, 'the meeting is at 12 noon Central Time'? If you say '12 noon CST' we all know it is the middle of the day for people in Chicago. It provides information that is immediately understandable.

      People will always be up during daylight hours. People around the world will not all be

  • Remove it (Score:4, Interesting)

    by neo8750 (566137) <zepskiNO@SPAMzepski.net> on Sunday November 03, 2013 @11:55AM (#45317695) Homepage
    I live in part of the US who up until a few years ago didn't have DST. I will say I hate it. During the summer when the days are the longest you will still have daylight at 11:00pm(23:00). Then in the winder it gets dark at 4pm So i go to work in the dark come home in the dark. Where as before I come home it still be light in winter and in summer the sun would be down before 10.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by fustakrakich (1673220)

      A better solution would be to shorten the workday. Nobody should have to work more than 6 hours anyway. Daylight 'savings' is pretty dumb. It's especially stupid in the lower latitudes. Here's looking at you, Mexico.

    • by Xtifr (1323)

      Then in the win[t]er it gets dark at 4pm So i go to work in the dark come home in the dark. Where as before I come home it still be light in winter [...]

      You realize this makes no sense, right? DST is only in effect from March to early November. The time during winter is the same as it always was.

      I'm no fan of DST, but lets try to stick to arguments that make a lick of sense, mm-kay? The fact that you used to come home before 4pm but no longer do (the only possible explanation for what you wrote) is hardly the fault of DST.

    • by evilviper (135110)

      Where as before I come home it still be light in winter and in summer the sun would be down before 10.

      Interesting to hear that DST has caused a rip in the space-time continuum that caused it to screw-up standard time, too.

      I think I've found just the woman for you:
      http://www.colinsun.com/Colin/nfblog/wp-content/uploads/2007/04/letter_to_editor.jpg [colinsun.com]

    • by geirlk (171706)

      Living in the northern hemisphere, we're used to huge changes in the days.

      Here in the capital of .no, Oslo, the longest day is just under 19 hours long. June 21. the sun gets up at 03:54AM, and goes down 10:44PM, accounting for a day of 18h 50m 01s
      The summers are incredible, as it never truly gets dark.

      The shortest day is under 6 hours. December 21., the sun goes up at 09:18AM, and down again at 3:12PM. That's 5h 53m 54s.

      Hours are adjusted for DST.

      We're not even living that far north, all things considered

  • Because I work for myself, I don't leave the house until daybreak. With rare exception, that work is done long before dark thirty.
  • by ka9dgx (72702) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @12:16PM (#45317855) Homepage Journal

    Let's go back to the way God intended it to be... local solar noon. Let the computers sort it out. ;-)

  • I'd keep it as it is as I don't want my kids going to school in the dark.
    They have to come home in the dark for a month or two but that's unavoidable.

    I'm in Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Anywhere from the Scottish border north benefits from daylight savings for the purpose of not having to do the morning commute in darkness.
    As you get further north (e.g Iceland) it makes no difference (day break at 11am, nightfall 2pm).

    So there's a sweet spot between 54 & 60 degrees north where any country in that region would be

    • by PPH (736903)

      I'd keep it as it is as I don't want my kids going to school in the dark.
      They have to come home in the dark for a month or two but that's unavoidable.

      I know where they are going in the morning. In the evening, they are out randomly playing in the street.

      Think about which situation is more hazardous.

  • by NotQuiteReal (608241) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @01:15PM (#45318351) Journal
    This set of charts [wikipedia.org] explains why DST is a good idea if you are not on the equator...
    • by jameson (54982)

      Or you could just get up earlier/later on your own time.
      If there is a need for government regulation here (which I don't think there is, but I may be missing something), then you can regulate that opening hours of stores stores have to shift by an hour during the summer, relative to their normal posted times. Which will still affect some people, but at least (a) eliminate the main conceptual issues of double/missing hours, and (b) remove the practical issues for _some_ of the people affected now.

      • Or you could just get up earlier/later on your own time.

        exactly...

        using daylight savings time is *exactly the same* as getting up an hour earlier

        it's easier to officially change the time than to move and adjust literally 100,000s of schedules for everything from mail delivery to court hearings...

        daylight savings time **saves daylight** by taking advantage of the fact that our measurement of time is relative

        it's not a hard concept...I honestly think many people oppose daylight savings time b/c it the notion

    • by ath1901 (1570281)

      Yeah, but in our modern world it isn't sunlight but rather electrical lights (and curtains) that control our sleep cycle. Adjusting to sunlight only makes sense for the very few who actually work outdoors and not in in an office with artificial light.

  • Noon (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Aryden (1872756) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @01:50PM (#45318613)
    Set it so that noon is when the sun is at it's apex and be done with it.
    • Re:Noon (Score:4, Informative)

      by camperdave (969942) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @10:33PM (#45321821) Journal

      Set it so that noon is when the sun is at it's apex and be done with it.

      That would require daily adjustments to practically every clock on the planet. The Earth's orbit isn't a perfect circle, so Noon tomorrow isn't 24hrs from Noon today. In fact, apparent solar time (what a sundial would show) can differ from mean solar time (keeping Noon times exactly 24 hrs apart) by as much as sixteen and a half minutes. Perhaps you've seen that lopsided figure eight that they print on globes? It's called an analemma [wikipedia.org] and it shows how much we'd have to adjust the clocks each day if we followed your scheme.

    • by hutsell (1228828)

      Set it so that noon is when the sun is at it's apex and be done with it.

      I beleive that used to be called Railroad Time [history.com].

      The many different railway times [wikipedia.org] across the North American continent were based on the local (high-noon) times determined by thousands of communities. The problems it created with the railroads, some serious, eventually resulted in the railroad companies to create and determine the borders of the four time zones presently used; without getting government approval, which included ignoring the demands of everyone who wanted the Sun to be at high-noon in their

  • Completely obsolete (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Highland Deck Box (2786087) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @03:51PM (#45319435)
    Ok so what are the supposed benefits of DST? Percentage of the workforce working farming etc who need the extra daylight is vanishingly small and will only get smaller. Any energy savings from using less lighting is negated by switching to LED bulbs over incandescent. Any extra daylight benefits in general are surely completely negated by the disruption to people's sleep schedules and timetables twice a year. What else, it adds needless complication to timezone differences which in a global economy are already bad enough. It's a completely outdated idea that is just irritating as a convention that you are forced to follow because everyone else does. It's not even something that you can boycott unless you like showing up an hour late or early for all your appointments. It's just stupid.
    • Percentage of the workforce working farming etc who need the extra daylight is vanishingly small and will only get smaller.

      Not only that, I'd expect most sensible farmers to schedule their work by the sun, not the clock anyway. Start working when there's enough light to see what you're doing and stop when you're finished, or it's too dark, whichever comes first.
  • Pros and Cons (Score:4, Insightful)

    by GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @05:05PM (#45319865)
    What order of magnitude of hours have been lost coding for DST? I'm thinking on the order of a hundred k/million hours of code lost on doing software for this. Then you also have when software isn't coded correctly, the lost of functionality. Finally you have the unwashed masses being late or early constantly.

    Seems like the only reason DST is there is so the politicians can go,"Hah, look at a hoop we can make you jump through."
  • Asinine (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Gim Tom (716904) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @07:52PM (#45320925)
    Why would anyone think you could make ANYTHING longer by cutting off one end and attaching it to the other?
  • Ask this question in the Spring and see how many people are in favor.
  • I'd see it returned to the old DST pre George W Bush adjustments. They wre made with the idea that they would save energy but they actually cost more energy.

  • AZ (Score:5, Insightful)

    by binarybum (468664) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @09:50PM (#45321623) Homepage

    Arizona may be backwards about the vast majority of things, but at least they have this right - daylight savings time doesn't exist!

  • by antdude (79039) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @10:50PM (#45321919) Homepage Journal

    I like the later lighter hours at night/evening times!

    • With such a short /. ID, why do you care about daylight hours? Aren't you always in your mom's basement anyway? ;-)
  • by The Other White Meat (59114) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @11:45PM (#45322211)

    Weekend Savings Time: Friday @ 4 PM, skip ahead to 5 and leave work early. Monday @ 7 AM, set the clock an hour and sleep in.

  • Keep DST, but remove the mandatory biannual whining. Seriously, year round, nobody cares, but twice a year without fail, people bitch about it, and then forget it.
  • Small children function on the sun cycle, so now they wake up at 6:15 rather than 7:15. Uhg. And they don't go to bed earlier, at least they didn't last night. And my internal clock has no idea what is going on. Anyway, we lost an hour of sleep...

  • DST is great stuff. It give bloggers and trolls something unimportant to get all riled up about. How can you not love that?
  • ...and then adjust working hours based on what makes sense in that particular city / region.

    Note: I live in the EST time zone.
  • by smash (1351)

    Shift working hours if you like, but for fucks sake, stop messing with the clock. Plenty of shift workers will agree, getting stiffed for working an extra hour on your night shift when the clock rolls back sucks. Plenty of IT nerds will agree, moving the clock around is an un-necessary waste of time and money, and a cause of a massive number of bugs.

    But hey, the fuckwits who put forward laws like this have never had to think about or deal with any of that shit.

  • by lazlo (15906) on Monday November 04, 2013 @12:58PM (#45326897) Homepage

    I propose a compromise. I'm fine with the "Fall back" portion, but we really need to get rid of the "Spring forward" part. It may take some getting used to, but I figure we'll be comfortable with it within 24 years.

  • by Jonathunder (105885) on Monday November 04, 2013 @04:45PM (#45329797) Homepage

    An uncle of mine told me about his first meeting with my great-grandfather, decades ago. He noticed all the clocks in the old man's house were off, by exactly half an hour, so he asked about it. "You know what they have in this country?" Grandad asked, sucking his pipe. "Daylight time! I don't agree with it, but I will meet anybody half way."

  • by NEDHead (1651195) on Monday November 04, 2013 @07:29PM (#45331351)

    Why don't we make the hours from 9 am to 5 pm 40 minutes long, and we can have more time at both ends of the day!

Don't sweat it -- it's only ones and zeros. -- P. Skelly

 



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